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Diffraction before destruction
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and condensed matter physics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and condensed matter physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
2014 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 369, no 1647, 20130313- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

X-ray free-electron lasers have opened up the possibility of structure determination of protein crystals at room temperature, free of radiation damage. The femtosecond-duration pulses of these sources enable diffraction signals to be collected from samples at doses of 1000 MGy or higher. The sample is vaporized by the intense pulse, but not before the scattering that gives rise to the diffraction pattern takes place. Consequently, only a single flash diffraction pattern can be recorded from a crystal, giving rise to the method of serial crystallography where tens of thousands of patterns are collected from individual crystals that flow across the beam and the patterns are indexed and aggregated into a set of structure factors. The high-dose tolerance and the many-crystal averaging approach allow data to be collected from much smaller crystals than have been examined at synchrotron radiation facilities, even from radiation-sensitive samples. Here, we review the interaction of intense femtosecond X-ray pulses with materials and discuss the implications for structure determination. We identify various dose regimes and conclude that the strongest achievable signals for a given sample are attained at the highest possible dose rates, from highest possible pulse intensities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 369, no 1647, 20130313- p.
Keyword [en]
protein crystallography, radiation damage, X-ray lasers
National Category
Condensed Matter Physics Biophysics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-228681DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2013.0313ISI: 000337367600003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-228681DiVA: diva2:735007
Available from: 2014-07-22 Created: 2014-07-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Caleman, CarlTimneanu, Nicusor

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