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Propofol Promotes Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and Heat Shock Protein (HSP 72 kd) Activation in the Developing Mouse Brain
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
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2014 (English)In: CNS & Neurological Disorders: Drug Targets, ISSN 1871-5273, E-ISSN 1996-3181, Vol. 13, no 9, 1595-1603 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anesthetic agents induce cellular stress and affect blood-brain barrier permeability in the developing brain causing brain dysfunction. In this investigation, effects of Propofol on the inducible heat shock protein (HSP72) and albumin immunoreactivity in the mouse brain was examined. Propofol was administered to postnatal day 10 mice once (10 mg/kg or 60 mg/kg subcutaneously). On the 75th day, 3 µm paraffin sections of midbrain were processed for HSP72 and albumin immunostaining. Saline-treated and age-matched mice served as controls. Propofol dose-dependently produced a significant increase the number of HSP72 and albumin-positive cells in cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and hypothalamus, a feature not seen in the saline-treated group. HSP72 and albumin activity in the propofol-treated group was largely confined to neurons and often localized to their cell cytoplasm and/or nucleus. HSP72 and albumin expression was most prominent in the cerebral cortex and in hippocampus, followed by hypothalamus and thalamus. These novel observations suggest that anesthetic agents, by inducing cellular stress in the developing brain and disruption of blood-brain barrier function, may have long lasting effects on adult brain function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 13, no 9, 1595-1603 p.
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Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-230454DOI: 10.2174/1871527313666140806122906ISI: 000346382000010PubMedID: 25106637OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-230454DiVA: diva2:740709
Available from: 2014-08-26 Created: 2014-08-26 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Sharma, Hari ShankerPonten, EmmaGordh, TorstenSharma, Aruna

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