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Climatic Factors and Community - Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft-Tissue Infections: A Time-Series Analysis Study
Department of Public Health Sciences (Global health/IHCAR), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Microbiology, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences (KIMS), Super Religare Laboratories Limited, Bhubaneswar, India.
Department of Public Health Sciences (Global health/IHCAR), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 11, no 9, 8996-9007 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Skin and soft tissue infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (SA-SSTIs) including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have experienced a significant surge all over the world. Changing climatic factors are affecting the global burden of dermatological infections and there is a lack of information on the association between climatic factors and MRSA infections. Therefore, association of temperature and relative humidity (RH) with occurrence of SA-SSTIs (n = 387) and also MRSA (n = 251) was monitored for 18 months in the outpatient clinic at a tertiary care hospital located in Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India. The Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method was used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Time-series analysis was used to investigate the potential association of climatic factors (weekly averages of maximum temperature, minimum temperature and RH) with weekly incidence of SA-SSTIs and MRSA infections. The analysis showed that a combination of weekly average maximum temperature above 33 °C coinciding with weekly average RH ranging between 55% and 78%, is most favorable for the occurrence of SA-SSTIs and MRSA and within these parameters, each unit increase in occurrence of MRSA was associated with increase in weekly average maximum temperature of 1.7 °C (p = 0.044) and weekly average RH increase of 10% (p = 0.097).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 11, no 9, 8996-9007 p.
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Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-232816DOI: 10.3390/ijerph110908996ISI: 000342027500023PubMedID: 25177823OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-232816DiVA: diva2:749876
Available from: 2014-09-25 Created: 2014-09-25 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Pathak, Ashish

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