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Microtone Analysis of Blues Vocal: Can Hatsune-Miku sing the Blues?
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014.
Keyword [en]
Microtone, Blues, Sound signal analysis, 12-tone scale, Vocal synthesizer
National Category
Music
Research subject
Musicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-234409OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-234409DiVA: diva2:756608
Conference
13th annual international conference “NICOGRAPH International 2014”, 30 May - 1 June 2014, Visby, Sweden
Note

Microtone music is made up of intervals not found in the Western equal-tempered 12-tone scale. This paper describes an attempt to analyze blues vocals originated in US during the early twentieth century and to then represent the vocal line electronically based on this analysis. We have used recordings from the famous blues singer Robert Johnson from 1936 and 1937 and have measured the frequency of his vocal line to determine the difference between the result and the 12-tone scale. By doing so we have obtained the musical notation in microtones. We were then able to re-create the vocals by using a digital sound generator in an attempt to produce a precise replica of the original vocal line. Our final goal is to explore how microtonal singing may evoke ethnic sounding music and corresponding emotional responses in listeners. In addition, we aim to open up the field of synthesized vocal music such as "Hatsune-Miku" towards the worldwide ethnic music beyond the Western 12-tone music.

Available from: 2014-10-17 Created: 2014-10-17 Last updated: 2014-10-29Bibliographically approved

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Hayashi, MasakiBachelder, StevenNakajima, Masayuki

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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