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A worldwide survey of genome sequence variation provides insight into the evolutionary history of the honeybee Apis mellifera
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
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2014 (English)In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 46, no 10, 1081-1088 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Description
Abstract [en]

The honeybee Apis mellifera has major ecological and economic importance. We analyze patterns of genetic variation at 8.3 million SNPs, identified by sequencing 140 honeybee genomes from a worldwide sample of 14 populations at a combined total depth of 634×. These data provide insight into the evolutionary history and genetic basis of local adaptation in this species. We find evidence that population sizes have fluctuated greatly, mirroring historical fluctuations in climate, although contemporary populations have high genetic diversity, indicating the absence of domestication bottlenecks. Levels of genetic variation are strongly shaped by natural selection and are highly correlated with patterns of gene expression and DNA methylation. We identify genomic signatures of local adaptation, which are enriched in genes expressed in workers and in immune system- and sperm motility-related genes that might underlie geographic variation in reproduction, dispersal and disease resistance. This study provides a framework for future investigations into responses to pathogens and climate change in honeybees.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 46, no 10, 1081-1088 p.
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Genetics
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-234557DOI: 10.1038/ng.3077ISI: 000342554100010PubMedID: 25151355OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-234557DiVA: diva2:757044
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2010-1295
Available from: 2014-10-20 Created: 2014-10-20 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Wallberg, AndreasWellhagen, GustafWebster, Matthew T

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