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Brominated flame retardant exposure of aircraft personnel
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
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2014 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 116, no SI, 83-90 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in aircraft is the result of high fire safety demands. Personnel working in or with aircraft might therefore be exposed to several BFRs. Previous studies have reported PBDE exposure in flight attendants and in passengers. One other group that may be subjected to significant BFR exposure via inhalation, are the aircraft maintenance workers. Personnel exposure both during flights and maintenance of aircraft, are investigated in the present study. Several BFRs were present in air and dust sampled during both the exposure scenarios; PBDEs, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis (2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane. PBDEs were also analyzed in serum from pilots/cabin crew, maintenance workers and from a control group of individuals without any occupational aircraft exposure. Significantly higher concentrations of PBDEs were found in maintenance workers compared to pilots/cabin crew and control subjects with median total PBDE concentrations of 19, 6.8 and 6.6 pmol g(-1) lipids, respectively. Pilots and cabin crew had similar concentrations of most PBDEs as the control group, except for BDE-153 and BDE-154 which were significantly higher. Results indicate higher concentrations among some of the pilots compared to the cabin crew. It is however, evident that the cabin personnel have lower BFR exposures compared to maintenance workers that are exposed to such a degree that their blood levels are significantly different from the control group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 116, no SI, 83-90 p.
Keyword [en]
Occupational exposure, Pilots, Cabin crew, Aircraft maintenance workers, BFRs
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-237276DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2014.03.073ISI: 000343623200013PubMedID: 24745557OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-237276DiVA: diva2:768410
Available from: 2014-12-03 Created: 2014-12-01 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Smedje, GretaLindgren, Torsten

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