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A high birth weight is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning/Gustafsson)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning/Gustafsson)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning/Gustafsson)
2015 (English)In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, Vol. 10, no 2, 77-83 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The association between low birth weight and adult disease is well known. Less is known on long-term effects of high birth weight.

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate whether a high birth weight increases risk for adult metabolic disease.

METHODS: Swedish term single births, 1973-1982 (nā€‰=ā€‰759ā€‰999), were studied to age 27.5-37.5 years using Swedish national registers. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated in relation to birth weight for type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia.

RESULTS: Men with birth weights between 2 and 3 standard deviation score (SDS) had a 1.9-fold increased risk (HR 1.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25-2.90) of type 2 diabetes, whereas those with birth weights above 3 SDS had a 5.4-fold increased risk (HR 5.44, 95% CI 2.70-10.96) compared to men with birth weights between -2 and 2 SDS. The corresponding HRs for women were 0.60 (95% CI 0.40-0.91) and 1.71 (95% CI 0.85-3.43) for birth weights 2-3 SDS and >3 SDS, respectively. Men with birth weights between 2 and 3 SDS had a 1.5-fold increased risk (HR 1.47, 95% CI 1.22-1.77) of obesity. The corresponding risk for women was 1.3-fold increased (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.19-1.46). For men and women with birth weights above 3 SDS, the risks of adult obesity were higher, HR 2.46 (95% CI 1.63-3.71) and HR 1.85 (95% CI 1.44-2.37), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: A high birth weight, particularly very high, increases the risk of type 2 diabetes in male young adults. The risk of obesity increases with increasing birth weight in both genders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 10, no 2, 77-83 p.
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-238292DOI: 10.1111/ijpo.230ISI: 000351432400001PubMedID: 24916852OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-238292DiVA: diva2:770781
Available from: 2014-12-11 Created: 2014-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Johnsson, Inger WAhlsson, FredrikGustafsson, Jan

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