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Can marine bacteria be recruited from freshwater sources and the air?
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
2014 (English)In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 8, no 12, 2423-2430 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is now clear evidence that microorganisms present biogeographic patterns, yet the processes that create and maintain them are still not well understood. In particular, the contribution of dispersal and its exact impact on local community composition is still unclear. For example, dispersing cells may not thrive in recipient environments, but may still remain part of the local species pool. Here, we experimentally tested if marine bacteria can be retrieved from freshwater communities (pelagic and sediment) and the atmosphere by exposing bacteria from three lakes, that differ in their proximity to the Norwegian Sea, to marine conditions. We found that the percentage of freshwater taxa decreased with increasing salinities, whereas marine taxa increased along the same gradient. Our results further showed that this increase was stronger for lake and sediment compared with air communities. Further, significant increases in the average niche breadth of taxa were found for all sources, and in particular lake water and sediment communities, at higher salinities. Our results therefore suggests that marine taxa can readily grow from freshwater sources, but that the response was likely driven by the growth of habitat generalists that are typically found in marine systems. Finally, there was a greater proportion of marine taxa found in communities originating from the lake closest to the Norwegian Sea. In summary, this study shows that the interplay between bacterial dispersal limitation and dispersal from internal and external sources may have an important role for community recovery in response to environmental change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 8, no 12, 2423-2430 p.
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-238728DOI: 10.1038/ismej.2014.89ISI: 000345498200008PubMedID: 24906016OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-238728DiVA: diva2:772034
Available from: 2014-12-16 Created: 2014-12-16 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Lindström, EvaEiler, AlexanderLangenheder, Silke

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