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Ancestral vertebrate complexity of the opioid system
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology. (Pharmacology)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology. (Pharmacology)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology. (Pharmacology)
2015 (English)In: Nociceptin Opioid / [ed] Gerald Litwack, Academic Press, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The evolution of the opioid peptides and nociceptin/orphanin as well as their receptors has been difficult to resolve due to variable evolutionary rates. By combining sequence comparisons with information on the chromosomal locations of the genes, we have deduced the following evolutionary scenario: The vertebrate predecessor had one opi- oid precursor gene and one receptor gene. The two genome doublings before the ver- tebrate radiation resulted in three peptide precursor genes whereupon a fourth copy arose by a local gene duplication. These four precursors diverged to become the pre- propeptides for endorphin (POMC), enkephalins, dynorphins, and nociceptin, respec- tively. The ancestral receptor gene was quadrupled in the genome doublings leading to delta, kappa, and mu and the nociceptin/orphanin receptor. This scenario is corroborated by new data presented here for coelacanth and spotted gar, rep- resenting two basal branches in the vertebrate tree. A third genome doubling in the ancestor of teleost fishes generated additional gene copies. These results show that the opioid system was quite complex already in the first vertebrates and that it has more components in teleost fishes than in mammals. From an evolutionary point of view, nociceptin and its receptor can be considered full-fledged members of the opioid system. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2015.
Series
Vitamins and Hormones, ISSN 0083-6729 ; 97
Keyword [en]
Neuropeptide, receptor, evolution, opioid
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Evolutionary Genetics; Neuroscience
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-240040DOI: 10.1016/bs.vh.2014.11.001ISBN: 978-0-12-802443-0 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-240040DiVA: diva2:775799
Available from: 2015-01-05 Created: 2015-01-05 Last updated: 2016-02-28

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Larhammar, DanBergqvist, Christina A.

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