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Alkaline phosphatase in healthy children: reference intervals and prevalence of elevated levels.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning/Gustafsson)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Reproduktiv hälsa/Sundström Poromaa)
2014 (English)In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 82, no 6, 399-404 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Transient hyperphosphatasemia (TH) is an often unnoticed benign entity, primarily affecting children below 5 years of age. However, the prevalence among healthy children is unknown. We used data from a Swedish pediatric reference interval project to estimate the prevalence of high alkaline phosphatase (ALP) among healthy children and to calculate pediatric reference intervals.

METHODS: Blood was collected from 699 subjectively healthy children aged 6 months to 18 years. After exclusion of subjects with high ALP, age- and gender-specific reference intervals were calculated.

RESULTS: Six children had ALP levels >16.7 µkat/l (>1,000 U/l), including 4 females and 2 males aged 7-22 months. The prevalence in the age group from 6 months to 2 years was 6.2% (6/97). None of the older children had levels of ALP >16.7 µkat/l. The study did not include the follow-up of these apparently healthy children. Consequently, conditions others than TH explaining the elevated ALP could not be excluded. However, general chemistry analyses, such as liver enzymes, calcium, intact PTH and vitamin D, were essentially normal in these children.

CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of high ALP among subjectively healthy children was approximately 2.4% below 5 years of age and 6.2% below 2 years. Reference intervals vary with age and gender.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 82, no 6, 399-404 p.
National Category
Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-244228DOI: 10.1159/000369205ISI: 000347918800008PubMedID: 25531333OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-244228DiVA: diva2:788126
Available from: 2015-02-12 Created: 2015-02-12 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Ridefelt, PeterGustafsson, JanHellberg, Dan

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Biochemial structure and functionDepartment of Women's and Children's HealthCenter for Clinical Research Dalarna
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