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Alcohol Consumption After Severe Burn: A Prospective Study
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. (psykiatri)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. (psykiatri)
2015 (English)In: Psychosomatics, ISSN 0033-3182, E-ISSN 1545-7206, Vol. 56, no 4, 390-396 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The number of patients with alcohol-related burns admitted to burn units has increased. It has been reported previously that alcohol-related burns are an indicator of alcohol dependence, but there are few studies addressing alcohol use several years after burn injury.

Objective

To investigate alcohol consumption 2–7 years after burn injury and to examine possible contributing factors.

Methods

Consecutive adult patients with burns (n = 67) were included during hospitalization, and an interview was performed at 2–7 (mean = 4.6) years after burn. Data assessed at baseline were injury characteristics, sociodemographic variables, coping, and psychiatric disorders. At follow-up, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test was used to identify at-risk drinking.

Results

Overall, 22% of the burns were alcohol-related; however, this was not associated with at-risk drinking at follow-up. Of the former patients with burns, 17 (25%) were identified as having an at-risk drinking pattern at follow-up. One item in the Coping With Burns Questionnaire used in acute care, “I use alcohol, tobacco or other drugs to be able to handle my problems”, was the only factor found to predict an at-risk drinking pattern several years after injury.

Conclusion

There were more at-risk drinkers in this burn population as compared with in the general population. The results indicate that an avoidant coping pattern, including the use of alcohol to handle problems, can be considered a potentially modifiable factor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 56, no 4, 390-396 p.
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-244755DOI: 10.1016/j.psym.2014.05.019ISI: 000356626100009PubMedID: 25553819OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-244755DiVA: diva2:789829
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2007-5918-47607-66
Available from: 2015-02-20 Created: 2015-02-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Sveen, JosefinÖster, Caisa

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