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Impact of personality disorders on health-related quality of life one year after burn injury
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. (psykiatri)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
2015 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 534-540Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Personality disorders (PDs) are associated with significant distress, disability, and cause great difficulties in life. PDs have been suggested to influence adaptation after major burns, but the potential relationship has not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of PDs in 107 patients with major burn injury, and to identify the impact of PDs on perceived patient outcome assessed as health-related quality of life (HRQoL) one year after burn. Methods: One burn-specific instrument (Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B)) and two generic instruments (EuroQol Five Dimensions and Short Form 36 Health Survey) were used, and Psychiatric Axis I and II disorders were assessed one year post burn. Results: This study identified an above normal prevalence of PDs among individuals afflicted by burn, and participants with PD had a significantly larger lifetime burden of Axis I disorders compared to participants without PD. Participants with PDs scored significantly lower than those without PD in the BSHS-B domain Skin involvement, and the effect of having a PD was related to the subscale Treatment regimens. There was no relationship between the presence of PD and generic HRQoL. Conclusions: An implication of these observations is that special rehabilitation efforts including more tailored interventions must be offered to these patients to ensure that the obstacles they perceive to caring for themselves in this respect are eliminated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 37, no 6, p. 534-540
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Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-244770DOI: 10.3109/09638288.2014.933898ISI: 000351007500008PubMedID: 24963942OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-244770DiVA, id: diva2:789833
Available from: 2015-02-20 Created: 2015-02-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Gerdin, BengtÖster, Caisa

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