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Information and knowledge about Down syndrome among women and partners after first trimester combined testing
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
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2015 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 94, no 3, 329-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We assessed reasons among women and partners for choosing combined ultrasound-biochemistry testing, information and knowledge about Down syndrome and decisions concerning invasive procedures and termination of pregnancy in a prospective cohort study in Uppsala County. In all 105 pregnant women and 104 partners coming for a combined ultrasound-biochemistry test answered a questionnaire. The most common reason for a combined ultrasound-biochemistry test was "to perform all tests possible to make sure the baby is healthy". Internet and midwives were the most common sources of information. Seventy-two percent had not received information on what it means to live with a child with Down syndrome. Many expectant parents perceived information as insufficient. Both women and partners had varying or low levels of knowledge about medical, cognitive and social consequences of Down syndrome. Twenty-five percent had not decided on an invasive test if indicated and only 42% would consider termination of pregnancy with a Down syndrome diagnosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 94, no 3, 329-32 p.
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Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-245332DOI: 10.1111/aogs.12560ISI: 000349603600016PubMedID: 25582972OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-245332DiVA: diva2:791121
Available from: 2015-02-26 Created: 2015-02-26 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Ternby, EllenIngvoldstad, CharlottaAnnerén, GöranLindgren, PeterAxelsson, Ove

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Obstetrics and GynaecologyLifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illnessMedicinsk genetik och genomikCentrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD)
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Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
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