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Breathing Exercises with Positive Expiratory Pressure after Abdominal Surgery The Current Phys: The Current Physical Therapy Practice in Sweden
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy. (Fysioterapi)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
2013 (English)In: Journal of Anesthesia & Clinical Research, ISSN 2155-6148, E-ISSN 2155-6148, Vol. 4, no 6, 1000325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: In Sweden breathing exercises with Positive Expiratory Pressure (PEP) are commonly recommended for the prevention of pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. Scientific documentation of the effects of PEP treatment is limited. The aim of this national survey was to describe the current physical therapy practice of PEP treatment after abdominal surgery in Sweden. Methods: A questionnaire was sent by e-mail to the 45 physical therapists who work with abdominal surgery patients in all seven university hospitals in Sweden. The questionnaire contained questions about the usage of PEP after abdominal surgery. Results: In total, 24 (54%) of the physical therapists answered the questionnaire. All reported using PEP as a treatment option after abdominal surgery. The most commonly used PEP device was the Blow bottle system and the PEP ventil system connected to a mouthpiece. Recommendations regarding treatment frequency and implementation varied significantly across respondents. The number of breaths per treatment varied considerably. Conclusion: All respondentsreported using PEP as a postoperative treatment on abdominal surgery wards. The treatment is most often recommended hourly during the first postoperative days. The common first-choice PEP devices were the Blow bottle system, Pep/Rmt set with mouthpiece or mask, Breathing exerciser/PEP valve system 22, and the Mini-PEP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 4, no 6, 1000325
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-253739DOI: 10.4172/2155-6148.1000325OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-253739DiVA: diva2:815896
Available from: 2015-06-02 Created: 2015-06-02 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, HenrikWesterdahl, Elisabeth

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