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Identifying implementation bottlenecks for maternal and newborn health interventions in rural districts of the United Republic of Tanzania
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
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2015 (English)In: Bulletin of the World Health Organization, ISSN 0042-9686, E-ISSN 1564-0604, Vol. 93, no 6, 380-389 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective To estimate effective coverage of maternal and newborn health interventions and to identify bottlenecks in their implementation in rural districts of the United Republic of Tanzania. Methods Cross-sectional data from households and health facilities in Tandahimba and Newala districts were used in the analysis. We adapted Tanahashi's model to estimate intervention coverage in conditional stages and to identify implementation bottlenecks in access, health facility readiness and clinical practice. The interventions studied were syphilis and pre-eclampsia screening, partograph use, active management of the third stage of labour and postpartum care. Findings Effective coverage was low in both districts, ranging from only 3% for postpartum care in Tandahimba to 49% for active management of the third stage of labour in Newala. In Tandahimba, health facility readiness was the largest bottleneck for most interventions, whereas in Newala, it was access. Clinical practice was another large bottleneck for syphilis screening in both districts. Conclusion The poor effective coverage of maternal and newborn health interventions in rural districts of the United Republic of Tanzania reinforces the need to prioritize health service quality. Access to high-quality local data by decision-makers would assist planning and prioritization. The approach of estimating effective coverage and identifying bottlenecks described here could facilitate progress towards universal health coverage for any area of care and in any context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 93, no 6, 380-389 p.
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Environmental Health and Occupational Health
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-259116DOI: 10.2471/BLT.14.141879ISI: 000356996200009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-259116DiVA: diva2:843367
Available from: 2015-07-28 Created: 2015-07-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Peterson, Stefan

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