uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Role of sleep disturbances in occupational accidents among women
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 41, no 4, 368-376 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives This population-based cohort study was performed to assess the association between sleep disturbances and the risk of occupational accidents among women. Methods Data were collected by questionnaires on two different occasions (2000 and 2010) and data on work injuries were also collected from Swedish government records (ISA). Insomnia symptoms were defined as having severe or very severe problems with (i) difficulty initiating sleep, (ii) difficulty maintaining sleep, or (iii) early morning awakening. Symptom of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) was defined as reporting both snoring and daytime sleepiness. Working-age respondents (20-67 years of age) who responded to both baseline and follow-up questionnaires and had worked for part or all of the 10-year follow-up period (N=4320) were included in the study. Results Of the subjects responding to the questionnaire, 12.2% reported >= 1 accident and 6.3% reported an accident requiring sick leave in the government register. Blue-collar workers and night and shift work were more common in the group with occupational accidents. Subjects with insomnia symptoms both at baseline and follow-up (persistent insomnia symptoms) ran a higher risk of being involved in an self-reported occupational accident [adjusted OR (ORadj) 1.5, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.2-2.0] after adjusting for age, body mass index, smoking, alcohol dependency, white- or blue-collar worker, years at work, night work, and physical activity. Persistent insomnia symptoms did not reach statistical significance as an independent predictor of register-reported occupational accident with sick leave (ORadj 1.4, 95% CI 0.99-2.1). No significant association was found between symptoms of OSAS and self-reported or register-based occupational accidents. Conclusions Persistent insomnia symptoms were associated with an increased risk of self-reported occupational accidents, while no significant association was found with occupational accidents with sick leave reported to government register.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 41, no 4, 368-376 p.
Keyword [en]
difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, insomnia, population-based study, work injury
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-259678DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.3495ISI: 000357361600006PubMedID: 25830787OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-259678DiVA: diva2:845111
Available from: 2015-08-10 Created: 2015-08-10 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Hägg, Shad AmidLindberg, Eva

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hägg, Shad AmidLindberg, Eva
By organisation
Respiratory Medicine and Allergology
In the same journal
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and EpidemiologyRespiratory Medicine and Allergy

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 389 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf