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Appearance of hepatobiliary diseases in a population-based cohort with inflammatory bowel diseases (Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort of the Uppsala Region)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Gastroenterology/Hepatology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Gastroenterology/Hepatology.
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 0815-9319, E-ISSN 1440-1746, Vol. 30, no 8, 1288-1292 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and AimTo prospectively follow the evolution of hepatobiliary diseases in a population-based cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. MethodsBetween 2005 and 2009, 790 incident cases of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease were registered in the Uppsala Health Region, corresponding to an average incidence of 20.0 and 9.9 new cases/100000 inhabitants/year, respectively. Liver function tests were analyzed in 97.1% and the results of ensuing investigations were summarized. ResultsSeventeen patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis were diagnosed corresponding to an overall prevalence of 2.2% (ulcerative colitis 1.7% and Crohn's disease 3.0%, respectively). The median age at diagnosis was 25 years (interquartile range: 17.0-34.0). Among the 92 patients below 17 years of age, three had autoimmune hepatitis and three primary sclerosing cholangitis, summing up to a prevalence of 6.5% immune-mediated hepatobiliary diseases among the pediatric patients. Three patients have undergone liver transplantation and one died of colonic carcinoma. Ten patients have demonstrated persistent elevation of alkaline phosphatases but had a normal magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (two patients) or refused further investigation (one patient). ConclusionIn this first large prospective population-based cohort of 526 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 264 with Crohn's disease, 17 cases of primary sclerosing cholangitis were found, among whom three (17%) so far have been liver transplanted and one has died of colon carcinoma. The average age of those affected by primary sclerosing cholangitis is considerably lower than usually reported. Ten patients had or have had elevated alkaline phosphatase without confirmed liver or biliary disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 30, no 8, 1288-1292 p.
Keyword [en]
autoimmune hepatitis, inflammatory bowel diseases, hepatobiliary diseases, primary sclerosing cholangitis
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-260820DOI: 10.1111/jgh.12947ISI: 000358436400014PubMedID: 25777994OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-260820DiVA: diva2:849308
Available from: 2015-08-28 Created: 2015-08-25 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Rönnblom, AndersRorsman, Fredrik

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