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Students’ interaction with IR cameras in POE laboratory exercises
Linköping University.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics. (Physics Didactics)
Linköping University.
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Thermal imaging delivered through hand-held infrared (IR) cameras offers an opportunity to make otherwise invisible and abstract thermal phenomena visible. We have developed and implemented a series of predict-observe-explain (POE) based laboratory activities with IR cameras, in order for students to develop their conceptual understanding of thermal science, at different educational levels. In a pilot study, 7th graders studied the phenomenon that metal feels colder than wood at room temperature. They experienced a cognitive conflict, but did not explain the phenomenon in terms of a heat flow from their hands to the objects, in spite of interaction with an IR-camera. Next, we developed laboratory exercises for 4th graders, including the task of holding metal and wood, and pouring hot water in cups of different materials and thickness, which were implemented in two parallel classes. In response to the 7th graders’ previous difficulties, the 4th graders were exposed to a heat-flow model, which they were found to apply during the exercises. In addition, they engaged in instant inquiry, i.e. performing brief ‘what-if’-scenarios, such as using the IR camera as a visualization tool to observe blowing on the hot water surface. For grades 10-12, such heat conduction experiments were complemented with dissipative phenomena, such as seeing temperature increases due to friction or collisions. With affordability on the rise, this easy-to-use technology is becoming an increasingly viable option for science education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-262729OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-262729DiVA: diva2:855044
Conference
11th Conference of the European Science Education Research Association (ESERA), Helsinki, Finland, 31 Aug-4 Sept
Available from: 2015-09-18 Created: 2015-09-18 Last updated: 2015-09-18

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Haglund, Jesper

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