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Pre- and Post-displacement Stressors and Body Weight Development in Iraqi Refugees in Michigan
Wayne State Univ, Dept Nutr & Food Sci, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
Wayne State Univ, Dept Nutr & Food Sci, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Wayne State Univ, Inst Environm Hlth Sci, Div Occupat & Environm Hlth, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI 48201 USA..ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7173-4333
Wayne State Univ, Inst Environm Hlth Sci, Div Occupat & Environm Hlth, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI 48201 USA..
2015 (English)In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, ISSN 1557-1912, E-ISSN 1557-1920, Vol. 17, no 5, 1468-1475 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Refugees have typically experienced stress and trauma before entering the US. Stressors and mental health disorders may contribute to obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the body mass index (BMI) in Iraqi refugees settled in Michigan in relationship to pre- and post-migration stressors and mental health. Anthropometric and demographic data were collected from 290 Iraqi refugees immediately after they arrived in Michigan and one year after settlement. Significant increases were observed in BMI (+0.46 +/- A 0.09 kg/m(2), p < 0.0001) and the percentage of refugees suffering from hypertension (from 9.6 to 13.1 %, p < 0.05). Significant increases in stress, depression and acculturation, as well as decreases in post-migration trauma and social support, were also observed. Linear regression analyses failed to link stressors, well-being, and mental health to changes in BMI. It is likely that acculturation to a new lifestyle, including dietary patterns and physical activity levels, may have contributed to these changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 17, no 5, 1468-1475 p.
Keyword [en]
Iraqi refugees, Body mass index, Lifestyle, Acculturation, Nutrition, Mental health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264035DOI: 10.1007/s10903-014-0127-3ISI: 000360911300022PubMedID: 25376128OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-264035DiVA: diva2:859311
Available from: 2015-10-06 Created: 2015-10-05 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved

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Arnetz, Bengt

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