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A higher order visual neuron tuned to the spatial amplitude spectra of natural scenes
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
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2015 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, 8522Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Animal sensory systems are optimally adapted to those features typically encountered in natural surrounds, thus allowing neurons with limited bandwidth to encode challengingly large input ranges. Natural scenes are not random, and peripheral visual systems in vertebrates and insects have evolved to respond efficiently to their typical spatial statistics. The mammalian visual cortex is also tuned to natural spatial statistics, but less is known about coding in higher order neurons in insects. To redress this we here record intracellularly from a higher order visual neuron in the hoverfly. We show that the cSIFE neuron, which is inhibited by stationary images, is maximally inhibited when the slope constant of the amplitude spectrum is close to the mean in natural scenes. The behavioural optomotor response is also strongest to images with naturalistic image statistics. Our results thus reveal a close coupling between the inherent statistics of natural scenes and higher order visual processing in insects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 6, 8522
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264173DOI: 10.1038/ncomms9522ISI: 000364930800007PubMedID: 26439748OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-264173DiVA: diva2:859323
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-4740
Note

Supplementary information available for this article at http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/151006/ncomms9522/suppinfo/ncomms9522_S1.html

Available from: 2015-10-06 Created: 2015-10-06 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1.
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2. The processing of natural images in the visual system
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The processing of natural images in the visual system
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Any image can be described in terms of its statistics (i.e. quantitative parameters calculated from the image, for example RMS-contrast, the skewness of image brightness distribution, and slope constant of an average amplitude spectrum).

It was previously shown that insect and vertebrate visual systems are optimised to the statistics common among natural scenes. However, the exact mechanisms of this process are still unclear and need further investigation.

This thesis presents the results of examining links between some image statistics and visual responses in humans and hoverflies.

It was found that while image statistics do not play the main role when hoverflies (Eristalis tenax and Episyrphus balteatus) chose what flowers to feed on, there is a link between hoverfly (Episyrphus balteatus) active behaviours and image statistics. There is a significant difference in the slope constant of the average amplitude spectrum, RMS contrast and skewness of brightness distribution between photos of areas where hoverflies were hovering or flying. These photos were also used to create a prediction model of hoverfly behaviour. After model validation, it was concluded that photos of both the ground and the surround should be used for best prediction of behaviour. The best predictor was skewness of image brightness distribution.

By using a trackball setup, the optomotor response in walking hoverflies (Eristalis tenax) was found to be influenced by the slope constant of an average amplitude spectrum. 

Intracellular recording showed that the higher-order neuron cSIFE (The centrifugal stationary inhibited flicker excited) in the hoverfly (Eristalis tenax) lobula plate was inhibited by a range of natural scenes and that this inhibition was strongest in a response to visual stimuli with the slope constant of an average amplitude spectrum of 1, which is the typical value for natural environments. 

Based on the results of psychophysics study in human subjects it was found that sleep deprivation affects human perception of naturalistic slope constants differently for different image categories (“food” and “real world scenes”).

These results help provide a better understanding of the link between visual processes and the spatial statistics of natural scenes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2017. 49 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1355
Keyword
natural scenes, image statistics, hoverflies, optomotor response, cSIFE neuron, sleep deprivation
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328041 (URN)978-91-513-0032-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-09-29, A1:111a, Uppsala Biomedicinska Centrum BMC, Husarg. 3, Uppsala, 09:15 (English)
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Supervisors
Available from: 2017-09-08 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Dyakova, OlgaNordström, Karin

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