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Client-centred ADL intervention after stroke: Significant others' experiences
Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 5, 377-386 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Client-centredness is a prominent contemporary concept in rehabilitation. However, there is a lack of knowledge on if and how a client-centred rehabilitation approach is incorporated in the everyday life of significant others of people who receive such rehabilitation. Objective: Explore and describe if and how a client-centred ADL intervention (CADL) was integrated in the everyday lives of significant others of people with stroke. Materials and methods: Qualitative longitudinal design, with a grounded theory approach. Seven significant others, who cohabited with persons receiving a CADL intervention, were interviewed during the first year. Findings: One core category was identified: "Taking responsibility and achieving balance with respect to self-esteem in order to get on with everyday life". The integration of the CADL was a process. A key aspect was that as the person with stroke acted upon his/her own desired activity goals the significant others were encouraged to act on their own needs. Conclusions: Enablement is important also for the significant others of people with stroke. One way of enabling significant others to maintain an active lifestyle and find respite in everyday life might be to enable people with stroke to formulate and act upon their desired activity goals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 22, no 5, 377-386 p.
Keyword [en]
spouses, social support, problem-solving, personal autonomy, occupational therapy, grounded theory, goal, caregiver burden
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264688DOI: 10.3109/11038128.2015.1044561ISI: 000361327800008PubMedID: 25974760OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-264688DiVA: diva2:861184
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilStockholm County Council
Available from: 2015-10-15 Created: 2015-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved

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