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Serologic and Molecular Prevalence of Rickettsia helvetica and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Wild Cervids and Domestic Mammals in the Central Parts of Sweden
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine, Clinical Bacteriology. Center of Clinical Research, Dalarna, Falun, Sweden..
Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Clin Sci, Div Reprod, Uppsala, Sweden.;Natl Vet Inst, Dept Pathol & Wildlife Dis, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
Natl Vet Inst, Dept Pathol & Wildlife Dis, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine, Clinical Bacteriology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases. Dalarna, Clin Res Ctr, Falun, Sweden..
2015 (English)In: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, ISSN 1530-3667, E-ISSN 1557-7759, Vol. 15, no 9, 529-534 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Both Rickettsia helvetica and Anaplasma phagocytophilum are common in Ixodes ricinus ticks in Sweden. Knowledge is limited regarding different animal species' competence to act as reservoirs for these organism. For this reason, blood samples were collected from wild cervids (roe deer, moose) and domestic mammals (horse, cat, dog) in central Sweden, and sera were tested using immunofluorescence assay to detect antibodies against spotted fever rickettsiae using Rickettsia helvetica as antigen. Sera with a titer >= 1:64 were considered as positive, and 23.1% (104/450) of the animals scored positive. The prevalence of seropositivity was 21.5% (23/107) in roe deer, 23.3% (21/90) in moose, 36.5% (23/63) in horses, 22.1% (19/90) in cats, and 17.0% (17/100) in dogs. PCR analysis of 113 spleen samples from moose and sheep from the corresponding areas were all negative for rickettsial DNA. In roe deer, 85% (91/107) also tested seropositive for A. phagocytophilum with a titer cutoff of 1:128. The findings indicate that the surveyed animal species are commonly exposed to rickettsiae and roe deer also to A. phagocytophilum.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 15, no 9, 529-534 p.
Keyword [en]
Anaplasma, Dog, Horse, Cat, Host, Roe deer, Moose, Rickettsia, Serology
National Category
Veterinary Science Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264670DOI: 10.1089/vbz.2015.1768ISI: 000361387200002PubMedID: 26378972OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-264670DiVA: diva2:861318
Available from: 2015-10-16 Created: 2015-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved

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Nilsson, Kenneth

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