uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Five-Year-Olds Punish Antisocial Adults
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Psychol, S-75105 Uppsala, Sweden..
2015 (English)In: Aggressive Behavior, ISSN 0096-140X, E-ISSN 1098-2337, Vol. 41, no 5, 413-420 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The human tendency to impose costs on those who have behaved antisocially towards third parties (third-party punishment) has a formative influence on societies, yet very few studies of the development of this tendency exist. In most studies where young children have punished, participants have imposed costs on puppets, leaving open the question as to whether young children punish in real third-party situations. Here, five-year-olds were given the opportunity to allocate desirable or unpleasant items to antisocial and neutral adults, who were presented as real and shown on video. Neutral individuals were almost always allocated only desirable items. Antisocial individuals were instead usually allocated unpleasant items, as long as participants were told they would give anonymously. Most participants who were instead told they would give in person did not allocate unpleasant items, although a minority did so. This indicates that the children interpreted the situation as real, and that whereas they genuinely desired to punish antisocial adults, they did not usually dare do so in person. Boys punished more frequently than girls. The willingness of preschoolers to spontaneously engage in third-party punishment, occasionally even risking the social costs of antagonizing an anti-social adult, demonstrates a deep-seated early-developing punitive sentiment in humans. Aggr. Behav. 41: 413-420, 2015.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 41, no 5, 413-420 p.
Keyword [en]
third-party punishment, preschoolers, children, antisocial behavior
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264852DOI: 10.1002/ab.21568ISI: 000361808600002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-264852DiVA: diva2:861745
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P2008-01039:1
Available from: 2015-10-19 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Kenward, Ben

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kenward, Ben
By organisation
Department of Psychology
In the same journal
Aggressive Behavior
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 322 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf