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Maximizing PV hosting capacity by smart allocation of PV: A case study on a Swedish distribution grid
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics. (Built Environment Energy Systems Group)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6586-4932
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics. (Built Environment Energy Systems Group)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics. (Built Environment Energy Systems Group (BEESG))
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of ASES Solar 2015, Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania, USA, July 28-30, 2015, 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Detailed simulations of large amounts of PV production in Swedish rural power grids show that as module and system prices keep declining and thus increasing the profitability and demand for solar power, current grid performance will limit the potential. Simulations have been made on a case distribution grid (10 kV) with actual hourly load data for 2014 and calculated hourly production with respect to building roof area, tilt and azimuth together with irradiation data. At high production, especially voltage rises along cables in the outer part of the grid is problematic, but also currents in cables close to transformer buses increases substantially at these conditions. Resulting hosting capacity for the case grid is 32%, as of annual production compared to annual demand. What is limiting the hosting capacity is the tolerated voltage rise, which is set to 5% of nominal grid voltage. Through smart allocation of PV systems to the strongest nodes in the grid the hosting capacity of the same grid can be increased to 74%.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
National Category
Energy Systems
Research subject
Engineering Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265444OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-265444DiVA, id: diva2:865697
Conference
ASES Solar 2015, Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania, USA, July 28-30, 2015
Available from: 2015-10-29 Created: 2015-10-29 Last updated: 2018-02-20
In thesis
1. Solar Variability Assessment and Grid Integration: Methodology Development and Case Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Solar Variability Assessment and Grid Integration: Methodology Development and Case Studies
2015 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

During the 21st century there has been a tremendous increase in grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) capacity globally, due to falling prices and introduction of economic incentives. PV systems are in most cases small-scale, installed on residential dwellings, which means that the power production is widely distributed and close to the end-user of electricity. In this licentiate thesis the distributed PV in the built environment is studied. A methodology for assessing short-term (sub-minute) solar variability was developed, which in the continuation of this PhD project could be used to study the aggregated impact on the local distribution grid from dispersed PV systems. In order to identify potential locations for PV systems in a future scenario, methodology was developed to assess the rooftop topography on both local level using LiDAR data and nationally through building statistics. Impacts on the distribution grid were investigated through a case study on a rural municipality in Sweden. It was found that the hosting capacity, i.e. the amount of PV power generation that can be integrated in the grid without exceeding certain power quality measures, is high, at least 30%. However, the hosting capacity on transmission level needs further investigation. As a first step a methodology was developed in order to model scenarios for hourly solar power generation, aggregated over wide areas, here applied to the whole Swedish power system. The model showed high correlation compared to PV power production reported to the Swedish transmission system operator (TSO). Furthermore, it was used to model scenarios of high PV penetration in Sweden, which give some indications on the impact on the power system, in terms of higher frequency of extreme ramps.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala University, Department of Engineering Sciences, 2015. p. 55
Keywords
Solar variability, Photovoltaics, Grid integration, GIS, Distributed generation
National Category
Energy Systems
Research subject
Engineering Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265451 (URN)
Presentation
2015-11-25, ITC 1111, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, Uppsala, 14:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
StandUp
Available from: 2016-01-12 Created: 2015-10-29 Last updated: 2018-02-20Bibliographically approved

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Lingfors, DavidMarklund, JesperWidén, Joakim

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