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Molecular organization and fine structure of the human tectorial membrane: is it replenished?
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. Gifu Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Otolaryngol, Gifu, Gifu 5011194, Japan.
Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Otolaryngol, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Otolaryngol, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
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2015 (English)In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 362, no 3, 513-527 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Auditory sensitivity and frequency resolution depend on the physical properties of the basilar membrane in combination with outer hair cell-based amplification in the cochlea. The physiological role of the tectorial membrane (TM) in hair cell transduction has been controversial for decades. New insights into the TM structure and function have been gained from studies of targeted gene disruption. Several missense mutations in genes regulating the human TM structure have been described with phenotypic expressions. Here, we portray the remarkable gradient structure and molecular organization of the human TM. Ultrastructural analysis and confocal immunohistochemistry were performed in freshly fixed human cochleae obtained during surgery. Based on these findings and recent literature, we discuss the role of human TMs in hair cell activation. Moreover, the outcome proposes that the α-tectorin-positive amorphous layer of the human TM is replenished and partly undergoes regeneration during life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 362, no 3, 513-527 p.
Keyword [en]
Tectorial membrane; Human; Electron microscopy; alpha-tectorin
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265776DOI: 10.1007/s00441-015-2225-5ISI: 000366322300004PubMedID: 26085343OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-265776DiVA: diva2:866540
Note

Corrections in Cell and Tissue Research, December 2015, Volume 362, Issue 3, pp 689-690, DOI: 10.1007/s00441-015-2284-7

Available from: 2015-11-03 Created: 2015-11-03 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved

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Hayashi, HisamitsuLiu, WeiRask-Andersen, Helge

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