uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Milk Consumption and Mortality from All Causes, Cardiovascular Disease, and Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 7, no 9, 7749-7763 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Results from epidemiological studies of milk consumption and mortality are inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies assessing the association of non-fermented and fermented milk consumption with mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. PubMed was searched until August 2015. A two-stage, random-effects, dose-response meta-analysis was used to combine study-specific results. Heterogeneity among studies was assessed with the I-2 statistic. During follow-up periods ranging from 4.1 to 25 years, 70,743 deaths occurred among 367,505 participants. The range of non-fermented and fermented milk consumption and the shape of the associations between milk consumption and mortality differed considerably between studies. There was substantial heterogeneity among studies of non-fermented milk consumption in relation to mortality from all causes (12 studies; I-2 = 94%), cardiovascular disease (five studies; I-2 = 93%), and cancer (four studies; I-2 = 75%) as well as among studies of fermented milk consumption and all-cause mortality (seven studies; I-2 = 88%). Thus, estimating pooled hazard ratios was not appropriate. Heterogeneity among studies was observed in most subgroups defined by sex, country, and study quality. In conclusion, we observed no consistent association between milk consumption and all-cause or cause-specific mortality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 7, no 9, 7749-7763 p.
Keyword [en]
cancer, cardiovascular disease, meta-analysis, milk, mortality
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265929DOI: 10.3390/nu7095363ISI: 000361889400037PubMedID: 26378576OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-265929DiVA: diva2:866966
Available from: 2015-11-04 Created: 2015-11-04 Last updated: 2017-12-01

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedFulltext

Authority records BETA

Michaëlsson, Karl

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Michaëlsson, Karl
By organisation
Orthopaedics
In the same journal
Nutrients
Cancer and OncologyNutrition and Dietetics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 460 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf