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Prediction of AD dementia by biomarkers following the NIA-AA and IWG diagnostic criteria in MCI patients from three European memory clinics
IRCCS, Ctr San Giovanni Dio Fatebenefratelli, Lab Epidemiol & Neuroimaging, Brescia, Italy..
IRCCS, Mario Negri Inst Pharmacol Res, Dept Biomed Engn, Med Imaging Unit, Bergamo, Italy..
Univ Cambridge, Dept Engn, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, England.;Bocconi Univ, Dept Decis Sci, Milan, Italy..
Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Alzheimer Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Dept Neurol, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
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2015 (English)In: Alzheimer's & Dementia, ISSN 1552-5260, E-ISSN 1552-5279, Vol. 11, no 10, 1191-1201 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

Introduction: Proposed diagnostic criteria (international working group and National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association) for Alzheimer's disease (AD) include markers of amyloidosis (abnormal cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] amyloid beta [A beta]42) and neurodegeneration (hippocampal atrophy, temporo-parietal hypometabolism on [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), and abnormal CSF tau). We aim to compare the accuracy of these biomarkers, individually and in combination, in predicting AD among mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients. Methods: In 73 MCI patients, followed to ascertain AD progression, markers were measured. Sensitivity and specificity, positive (LR+) and negative (LR-) likelihood ratios, and crude and adjusted hazard ratios were computed. Results: Twenty-nine MCI patients progressed and 44 remained stable. Positivity to any marker achieved the lowest LR- (0.0), whereas the combination A beta 42 plus FDG-PET achieved the highest LR+ (6.45). In a survival analysis, positivity to any marker was associated with 100% conversion rate, whereas negativity to all markers was associated with 100% stability. Discussion: The best criteria combined amyloidosis and neurodegeneration biomarkers, whereas the individual biomarker with the best performance was FDG-PET.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 11, no 10, 1191-1201 p.
Keyword [en]
Alzheimer's disease, MCI, MRI, PET, Diagnostic criteria, Diagnostic accuracy
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268703DOI: 10.1016/j.jalz.2014.12.001ISI: 000363968000008PubMedID: 25646957OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-268703DiVA: diva2:880219
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 05817
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved

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