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Adaptive ventilation for occasionally used churches
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
2013 (English)In: EWCHP-2013 / [ed] Alexandra Troi, Elena Lucchi, Bolzano: European Academy of Bozen / Bolzano (EURAC) , 2013, 55-62 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Many churches in Denmark and Sweden are rarely used for services or other activities. A simple climate control strategy is essential to avoid mold growth and attack by insects. Ventilation is the traditional method to reduce the humidity but it sometimes has the opposite effect. The ventilation needs to be controlled only to take in outside air, when it is drier than inside, to provide acceptable conditions. Adaptive ventilation was applied in three churches in Denmark and Sweden, each with a different heating regime. Nødebo church had intermittent heating for services in winter with basic heating to a constant temperature in between. Adaptive ventilation was only applied in the summer. The air was drawn from the outside without preheating. The ventilation reduced the relative humidity, but increased the short term fluctuations. Tyvelse church had intermittent heating for services during the winter, but no heating in between services. The air was drawn from the attic in order to gain heat from solar radiation in summer. It was assumed that preheating would raise the inside temperature slightly, and thereby reduce the RH, but no effect was observed. In Hangvar church, the intake air was preheated by a solar powered heating element. The preheating had only little effect on the interior RH, probably because of the large thermal capacity of the building itself. This is the major restriction for adaptive ventilation to work in very heavy buildings. A positive side effect is that the air quality inside the churches was improved by the ventilation because bad smells were removed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bolzano: European Academy of Bozen / Bolzano (EURAC) , 2013. 55-62 p.
Keyword [en]
Adaptive ventilation, climate control, rural church, mold growth
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268641ISBN: 978-88-88307-26-8 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-268641DiVA: diva2:881784
Conference
3rd European Workshop on Cultural Heritage Preservation, Bolzano, Italy, 2013.
Available from: 2015-12-11 Created: 2015-12-08 Last updated: 2015-12-14

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http://www.3encult.eu/en/deliverables/Documents/EWCHP2013_09.pdf

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Wessberg, MagnusBroström, Tor

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