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A cattle Country
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
2015 (English)In: Seminar, Vol. september, no 673Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. september, no 673
Keyword [en]
Mozambique, cattle, landuse, socio-environmental interactions, historical ecology
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268955DOI: www.india-seminar.com/semframe.htmlOAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-268955DiVA: diva2:881826
Note

A long-term history of cattle illustrates the intricate relationship between people, cattle and landscapes and the ecological skills of farmers and herders. This stands in contrast to the generally poor reputation of African swidden farmers and herders in the literature on    development and ecology, automatically and with scant critical analysis associated with the process of environmental degradation.

MOZAMBIQUE imports close to 90% of its meat requirements    in urban areas from other countries, an enigmatic fact considering that    Mozambique is, as I will argue here, a cattle country. The ‘solution’    advocated by many experts is industrialized cattle production and high yield    (non-traditional African) breeds. Such ideas and plans lack basic ecological    and historical understanding of the thriving cattle production that does    exist in many parts of Mozambique today. Traditional cattle keeping is in    many ways ecologically well suited to meet the environmental constraints of    episodic disease and droughts. It is also an enterprise that is low in    imposing environmental costs. The cattle usually roam freely over large    distances and grazing is low intensity and crucial for landscape openness    and biodiversity.

A long-term history of cattle illustrates the intricate  relationship between people, cattle and landscapes and the ecological skills  of farmers and herders. This stands in contrast to the generally poor  reputation of African swidden farmers and herders in the literature. One  reason for this association is simply that there is a general lack of knowledge of long-term environmental history which also has serious  mplications for landscape management and conservation.  Traditional cattle keeping is in  many ways ecologically well suited to meet the environmental constraints of episodic disease and droughts. It is also an enterprise that is low in imposing environmental costs.

Available from: 2015-12-11 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2015-12-11

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Ekblom, Anneli

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