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Predictors of self-efficacy in women on long-term sick leave
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden.. (Socialmedicinsk epidemiologisk forskning)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Univ Uppsala Hosp, ArbetsRehab Occupat & Environm Med, Uppsala, Sweden..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, ISSN 0342-5282, E-ISSN 1473-5660, Vol. 38, no 4, 320-326 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Resource type
Text
Abstract [en]

Self-efficacy has been shown to be related to sick leave and to be a predictor of return to work after sickness absence. The aim of this study was to investigate whether factors related to sick leave predict self-efficacy in women on long-term sick leave because of pain and/or mental illness. This cross-sectional study uses baseline data from 337 Swedish women with pain and/or mental illness. All included women took part in vocational rehabilitation. Data were collected through a sick leave register and a baseline questionnaire. General self-efficacy, sociodemographics, self-rated health, anxiety, depression, view of the future, and social support were measured and analyzed by univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses. The full multivariate linear regression model, which included mental health factors together with all measured factors, showed that anxiety and depression were the only predictive factors of lower self-efficacy (adjusted R-2 = 0.46, P < 0.001) and explained 46% of the variance in self-efficacy. The mean scores of general self-efficacy were low, especially in women born abroad, those with low motivation, those with uncertainties about returning to work, and women reporting distrust. Anxiety and depression are important factors to consider when targeting self-efficacy in vocational rehabilitation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 38, no 4, 320-326 p.
Keyword [en]
anxiety, depression, self-efficacy, sick leave, vocational rehabilitation, women
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268763DOI: 10.1097/MRR.0000000000000129ISI: 000364627800006PubMedID: 26258448OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-268763DiVA: diva2:882528
Available from: 2015-12-15 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2017-12-01
In thesis
1. Self-efficacy, Vocational Rehabilitation and Transition to Work
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-efficacy, Vocational Rehabilitation and Transition to Work
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The overall aim of this thesis was to examine the relationship between self-efficacy, individually tailored vocational rehabilitation and transition to work or studies.

Study I was a cross-sectional study based on questionnaire- and registry data, investigating whether factors related to sick leave predict self-efficacy in women on long-term sick leave (n= 337) due to pain and/or mental illness. General self-efficacy was low. Anxiety and depression were the strongest predictors for low self-efficacy.

Study II used longitudinal data from a randomised controlled trial, comprising partly the same women (n=401) as in Study I. Participants were allocated to either 1) assessment of multidisciplinary team and multimodal intervention (TEAM), 2) acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), or 3) control group. Self-efficacy increased in the TEAM group in comparison with the control group.

Study III had a descriptive qualitative design with individual interviews, studying participants’ (n=14) experiences with an individually tailored vocational rehabilitation project, and encounters with professionals working in it. The participants, who were on long-term sick leave due to mental illness or pain reported overall positive experiences with the project. The project was based on collaboration between authorities and motivational interviewing. The positive experiences were based on four categories: Opportunities for receiving various dimensions of support, Good overall treatment by the professionals, Satisfaction with the working methods of the project, and Opportunities for personal development.

Study IV was a prospective cohort study investigating perceived self-efficacy in unemployed young adults (n= 249) aged 19-29 year with disabilities, and the association between self-efficacy and transition to work or studies. The study used questionnaire- and registry data from a vocational rehabilitation project. Higher levels of self-efficacy were associated with increased odds for ‘transition to work’. General self-efficacy was low, and young adults with lower self-efficacy reported worse self-rated health compared with those with higher self-efficacy.

This thesis showed that multidisciplinary assessment with a multimodal intervention had positive effects on self-efficacy. Individually tailored vocational rehabilitation, based on cooperation and motivational interviewing, may be beneficial for individuals on long-term sick leave and the interactions between participants and the professionals may affect participants’ self-efficacy positively. Mental health needs to be considered when targeting self-efficacy in vocational rehabilitation. Furthermore, research is needed to a) clarify which components in the multidisciplinary team intervention can increase self-efficacy, b) study the effects of vocational rehabilitation based on an individual design, cooperation and motivational interviewing on self-efficacy, health and transition to work, and c) develop interventions that can increase self-efficacy and support transition to work/ studies in young adults with disabilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2017. 86 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1366
Keyword
Self-efficacy, Vocational Rehabilitation, Sick leave, Women, Multidisciplinary rehabilitation, Chronic pain, Mental illness, Motivational interviewing, Young adults, Disability, Unemployment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Social Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328796 (URN)978-91-513-0059-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-10-20, B/A1:111a, Biomedicinskt centrum, Uppsala Universitet, Husargatan 3, Uppsala, 12:15 (Swedish)
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Supervisors
Available from: 2017-09-28 Created: 2017-08-31 Last updated: 2017-10-17

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Andersén, ÅsaLarsson, KjerstinLytsy, PerKristiansson, PerAnderzén, Ingrid

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