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Prenatal attachment and it´s association with fetal movement during pregnancy: A population based survey
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Mittuniversitetet .
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
Sophiahemmet Högskola.
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(English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Objective: to investigate the association between the magnitude of fetal movements and level of prenatal attachment within a 24 hour period among women in the third trimester of pregnancy Design: a prospective population-based survey. Setting: A county in central Sweden Participants: Low risk pregnant women from 34 to 42 weeks gestation, N = 456, 299 multiparous and 157 primiparous women. Measurements: the revised version of the Prenatal Attachment Inventory (PAI-R) and assessment of the perception of fetal movements per 24 hours in the current gestational week. Findings: a total of 81 per cent of the eligible women completed the questionnaire. The overall sample of women found that the majority (96%) felt their baby move mostly in the evening as compared with other time periods in the 24 hour period. More than half of the respondents (55%) stated that they perceived frequent fetal movement on two occasions during a 24 hour period, while almost a fifth (18%) never or only once reported frequent fetal movement in a 24 hour period. Just over a quarter (26%) of respondents perceived frequent movement at least three times during a 24 hour period. Perceiving frequent fetal movements on three or more occasions during a 24 hour period in the third trimester, was associated with higher scores of prenatal attachment in all the three subscales on the PAI-R; “Anticipation”, “Differentiation” and “Interaction”.  Key conclusion: Perceiving frequent fetal movements at least during three occasions per 24 hours periods in late pregnancy was associated with prenatal attachment. Implications for practice: encouraging women to focus on fetal movements may positively affect prenatal attachment, especially among multiparous women > 35 years. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier.
Keyword [en]
Fetal movements, PAI-R, Pregnancy, Prenatal attachment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-271162OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-271162DiVA: diva2:891296
Available from: 2016-01-06 Created: 2016-01-06 Last updated: 2017-12-01
In thesis
1. Fetal Movements in late Pregnancy: Categorization, Self-assessment, and Prenatal Attachment in relation to women’s experiences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fetal Movements in late Pregnancy: Categorization, Self-assessment, and Prenatal Attachment in relation to women’s experiences
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim: To explore how pregnant women experience fetal movements in late pregnancy. Specific aims were:  to study women’s experiences during the time prior to receiving news that their unborn baby had died in utero (I), to investigate women’s descriptions of fetal movements (II), investigate the association between the magnitude of fetal movements and level of prenatal attachment (III), and to study women’s experiences using two different self-assessment methods (IV).

Methods: Interviews, questionnaires, and observations were used.

Results: Premonition that something had happened to their unborn baby, based on a lack of fetal movements, was experienced by the participants. The overall theme “something is wrong” describes the women’s insight that the baby’s life was threatened (I). Fetal movements that were sorted into the domain “powerful movements” were perceived in late pregnancy by 96 % of the participants (II). Perceiving frequent fetal movements on at least three occasions per 24 hours was associated with higher scores of prenatal attachment in all the three subscales on PAI-R. The majority (55%) of the 456 participants reported average occasions of frequent fetal movements, 26% several occasions and 18% reported few occasions of frequent fetal movements, during the current gestational week.  (III). Only one of the 40 participants did not find at least one method for monitoring fetal movements suitable. Fifteen of the 39 participants reported a preference for the mindfetalness method and five for the count-to-ten method. The women described the observation of the movements as a safe and reassuring moment for communication with their unborn baby (IV).

Conclusion:  In full-term and uncomplicated pregnancies, women usually perceive fetal movements as powerful. Furthermore, women in late pregnancy who reported frequent fetal movements on several occasions during a 24-hour period seem to have a high level of prenatal attachment. Women who used self-assessment methods for monitoring fetal movements felt calm and relaxed when observing the movements of their babies. They had a high compliance for both self-assessment methods. Women that had experienced a stillbirth in late pregnancy described that they had a premonition before they were told that their baby had died in utero. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2016. 73 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1171
Keyword
Fetal movements, pregnancy, prenatal attachment, self-assessment, stillbirth
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-271429 (URN)978-91-554-9446-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-02-25, Föreläsningssal 6, Högskolegatan 2, Falun, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-01-08 Last updated: 2016-02-12

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Malm, Mari-Cristin

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