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Serglycin protects against high fat diet-induced increase in serum LDL in mice
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
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2015 (English)In: Glycoconjugate Journal, ISSN 0282-0080, E-ISSN 1573-4986, Vol. 32, no 9, 703-714 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Proteoglycans have been implicated in regulation of lipoprotein metabolism. However, the impact of serglycin, the major proteoglycan expressed by many hematopoietic- and endothelial cells, on lipoprotein metabolism has not been explored. Here we addressed this issue by comparing several parameters of lipid metabolism in wild type (WT) and serglycin-/- mice, both at baseline and after feeding mice the Paigen diet. We show that, after feeding this diet for 20 weeks, serglycin deficient mice exhibited elevated concentrations of serum LDL in comparison with WT mice, thus suggesting that serglycin protects against an elevation of serum LDL levels after intake of a high-fat diet. Body weight increased in both groups, but only significantly in the serglycin-/- group. To explore the mechanism underlying this phenotype, genome-wide expression analysis was performed on liver tissues from WT and serglycin-/- mice. This analysis showed that serglycin-deficiency is associated with differential expression of numerous genes involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism, suggesting that the impact of serglycin on LDL levels may be related to effects at the gene expression level. In particular, several members of the CYP gene family were differently regulated in serglycin-/- compared with WT mice. Moreover, upstream regulator analysis suggested that several pro-inflammatory pathways, including the NFκB pathway, could contribute to the impact of serglycin on LDL. Hence, the elevation of serum LDL seen in serglycin-/- mice may be linked to dysregulated inflammatory responses. Taken together, our findings introduce serglycin as a novel player in processes that regulate lipid metabolism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 32, no 9, 703-714 p.
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-271495DOI: 10.1007/s10719-015-9621-7ISI: 000365281700006PubMedID: 26391682OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-271495DiVA: diva2:891993
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Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-01-08 Created: 2016-01-08 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved

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Pejler, Gunnar

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