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Epidermal exfoliation of over 95% after a burn in an 18-month-old boy: Case report and review of the literature
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9735-1434
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
2016 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 42, no 2, E18-E23 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This report concerns an 18-month-old boy who presented with a 6% total body surface area scald. The subject of this report is unique in that he developed the largest exfoliation described in literature. After 3 days an epidermal exfoliation with the appearance of a deliberately inflicted scald developed. As the exfoliation progressed to over 95% total body surface area the suspicion of child abuse or neglect could be abandoned. The diagnosis Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome was set, due to the finding of Staphylococcus aureus on swabs, the lack of mucosal engagement, and the patient's age. The boy's skin healed within 3 weeks. The few reports published are all case reports and most frequently described visually infected burns with smaller epidermal exfoliations, and clinically based exfoliation diagnosis. S. aureus often cause burn wound infections that can lead to complications caused by cross-infection. It is important for burn surgeons and intensive care specialists to be aware of the increased possibility of Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome occurring in patients who have a reduced barrier to infection such as burn patients and also, that the diagnosis can be difficult to make.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 42, no 2, E18-E23 p.
Keyword [en]
Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS); Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN); Burns; Children
National Category
Surgery Surgery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274687DOI: 10.1016/j.burns.2015.06.021ISI: 000372179600003PubMedID: 26803367OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-274687DiVA: diva2:897322
Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved

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Horna Strand, AngelicaRubertsson, StenHuss, FredrikMani, Maria

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