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Early to bed: a study of adaptation among sexually active urban adolescent girls younger than age sixteen.
Yale Child Study Center.
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2005 (English)In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 0890-8567, E-ISSN 1527-5418, Vol. 44, no 4, 358-67 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between sexual activity among urban adolescent girls and four global measures of psychosocial adaptation (academic motivation, school achievement, depressive symptoms, and expectations about the future).

METHOD: Data derived from the Social and Health Assessment, a self-report survey administered in 1998 to students in the public school system in New Haven, CT (149 classes at 17 middle and high schools).

RESULTS: Of 1,413 respondents (57% black, 28% Hispanic; mean age 13.4 +/- 1.7 years), 414 (29%) acknowledged prior sexual intercourse; the proportions of sexually active girls in 6th, 8th, and 10th grades were 14%, 30%, and 50%, respectively. In multivariate analyses of covariance, sexual activity was significantly associated with all four measures of psychosocial adaptation (p < .001). Other correlates of at least one measure of maladaptation included socioeconomic status, sensation seeking, and lower school grade (p < .001 for each), peer pressure (p < .01), and black ethnicity, and the interaction of sexual activity by lower school grade (p < .05 for each).

CONCLUSIONS: Compared with their sexually naive peers, sexually active adolescent girls had lower scores on global measures of psychosocial adaptation. These findings have clinical, policy, and research relevance to a vulnerable population at high risk of teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 44, no 4, 358-67 p.
National Category
Psychiatry
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-263324DOI: 10.1097/01.chi.0000153226.26850.fdPubMedID: 15782083OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-263324DiVA: diva2:903844
Available from: 2016-02-17 Created: 2015-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30

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Ruchkin, Vladislav

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