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Infants born large-for-gestational-age display slower growth in early infancy, but no epigenetic changes at birth
Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
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2015 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, 14540Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We evaluated the growth patterns of infants born large-for-gestational-age (LGA) from birth to age 1 year compared to those born appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA). In addition, we investigated possible epigenetic changes associated with being born LGA. Seventy-one newborns were classified by birth weight as AGA (10(th)-90(th) percentile; n = 42) or LGA (>90(th) percentile; n = 29). Post-natal follow-up until age 1 year was performed with clinical assessments at 3, 6, and 12 months. Genome-wide DNA methylation was analysed on umbilical tissue in 19 AGA and 27 LGA infants. At birth, LGA infants had greater weight (p < 0.0001), length (p < 0.0001), ponderal index (p = 0.020), as well as greater head (p < 0.0001), chest (p = 0.044), and abdominal (p = 0.007) circumferences than AGA newborns. LGA infants were still larger at the age of 3 months, but by age 6 months there were no more differences between groups, due to higher length and weight increments in AGA infants between 0 and 6 months (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.002, respectively). Genome-wide analysis showed no epigenetic differences between LGA and AGA infants. Overall, LGA infants had slower growth in early infancy, being anthropometrically similar to AGA infants by 6 months of age. In addition, differences between AGA and LGA newborns were not associated with epigenetic changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 5, 14540
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Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-279049DOI: 10.1038/srep14540ISI: 000361943700001PubMedID: 26419812OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-279049DiVA: diva2:907439
Available from: 2016-02-28 Created: 2016-02-28 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved

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Ahlsson, Fredrik

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