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Intakes of Micronutrients are Associated with Early Growth in Extremely Preterm Infants - A Population-Based Study.
Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University.
Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning)
Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University.
2016 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 885-892Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to describe micronutrient intakes and explore possible correlations to growth during the first 70 days of life in extremely preterm infants.

METHODS: Retrospective population-based study including extremely preterm infants (<27 weeks) born in Sweden during 2004-2007. Detailed nutritional and growth data were derived from hospital records.

RESULTS: Included infants (n = 531), had a mean gestational age of 25 weeks+2 days and a mean birth weight of 765 g. Estimated and adjusted intakes of calcium, phosphorus magnesium, zinc, copper, selenium, vitamin D and folate were lower than estimated requirements while intakes of iron, vitamin K and several water-soluble vitamins were higher than estimated requirements. High iron intakes were explained by blood transfusions. During the first 70 days of life, taking macronutrient intakes and severity of illness into account, folate intakes were positively associated with weight (p = 0.001) and length gain (p = 0.003) and iron intake was negatively associated with length gain (p = 0.006).

CONCLUSIONS: Intakes of several micronutrients were inconsistent with recommendations. Even when considering macronutrient intakes and severity of illness, several micronutrients were independent predictors of early growth. Low intake of folate was associated with poor growth of weight and length growth. Further, high iron supply was associated with poor length and head circumference growth. Optimized early micronutrient supply may improve early growth in extremely preterm infants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 62, no 6, p. 885-892
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-279050DOI: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000001085ISI: 000376560600027PubMedID: 26690864OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-279050DiVA, id: diva2:907442
Note

Funding: The study was supported by The May Flower Charity Foundation, Lilla Barnets Fond, Queen Silvia's Jubilee Foundation, Oskar Foundation, and Swedish Nutrition Foundation (SNF) and through regional agreement between Umea University and Vasterbotten County Council on cooperation in the field of Medicine, Odontology and Health (ALF).

Available from: 2016-02-28 Created: 2016-02-28 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved

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