uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Telemetric intracranial pressure monitoring: a noninvasive method to follow up children with complex craniosynostoses. A case report
Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Plast Surg, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Plast Surg, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Child's nervous system (Print), ISSN 0256-7040, E-ISSN 1433-0350, Vol. 32, no 7, 1311-1315 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: There are no reliable noninvasive methods of monitoring ICP. Most assessments are made by indirect measures and are difficult to follow over time. Invasive studies can be used but up until now have required in-hospital transcutaneous measurements. Accurate ICP recordings over longer periods of time can be very valuable in timing different surgical procedures in syndromal cases. This case shows that telemetric ICP monitoring can be used for long-term follow-up in patients that may need repeated surgeries related to their craniosynostosis condition.

CASE REPORT: In this report, the telemetric ICP probe (Raumedic Neurovent-P-tel) was implanted before surgery and was used for repeated "noninvasive" ICP recordings pre- and postoperatively in a patient with craniosynostosis. The patient was an eight-year-old girl with pansynostosis with only the right lambdoid suture open. A telemetric ICP probe was implanted the day before cranial vault remodeling and the ICP was monitored pre- and postoperatively. The ICP was above 15 mmHg 72.2 % of the monitoring time before surgery, and the amplitude of the curve was greater than normal suggesting impaired compliance. Direct postoperative ICP was normal, and the amplitude was lower. The ICP was then monitored both in out-patient clinic and in four longer hospital stays. Both the values and the curves were analyzed, and the time with ICP above 15 mmHg decreased over time, and the waveform amplitude of the curves improved.

CONCLUSION: This "noninvasive" way of recording ICP is a feasible and helpful tool in decision-making and intervening in patients with craniosynostosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 32, no 7, 1311-1315 p.
National Category
Other Clinical Medicine Pediatrics Neurology Surgery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-279522DOI: 10.1007/s00381-016-3023-4ISI: 000380056600022PubMedID: 26861131OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-279522DiVA: diva2:908323
Available from: 2016-03-02 Created: 2016-03-02 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Enblad, Per

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Howells, TimothySaiepour, DanielNowinski, DanielEnblad, PerNilsson, Pelle
In the same journal
Child's nervous system (Print)
Other Clinical MedicinePediatricsNeurologySurgery

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 539 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf