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Sex- and species-biased gene flow in a spotted eagle hybrid zone.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
2011 (English)In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Recent theoretical and empirical work points toward a significant role for sex-chromosome linked genes in the evolution of traits that induce reproductive isolation and for traits that evolve under influence of sexual selection. Empirical studies including recently diverged (Pleistocene), short-lived avian species pairs with short generation times have found that introgression occurs on the autosomes but not on the Z-chromosome. Here we study genetic differentiation and gene flow in the long-lived greater spotted eagle (Aquila clanga) and lesser spotted eagle (A. pomarina), two species with comparatively long generation times.

RESULTS: Our data suggest that there is a directional bias in migration rates between hybridizing spotted eagles in eastern Europe. We find that a model including post divergence gene flow fits our data best for both autosomal and Z-chromosome linked loci but, for the Z-chromosome, the rate is reduced in the direction from A. pomarina to A. clanga.

CONCLUSIONS: The fact that some introgression still occurs on the Z-chromosome between these species suggests that the differentiation process is in a more premature phase in our study system than in previously studied avian species pairs and that could be explained by a shorter divergence time and/or a longer average generation time in the spotted eagles. The results are in agreement with field observations and provide further insight into the role of sex-linked loci for the build-up of barriers to gene flow among diverging populations and species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 11
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280036DOI: 10.1186/1471-2148-11-100PubMedID: 21492478OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-280036DiVA: diva2:909570
Available from: 2016-03-07 Created: 2016-03-07 Last updated: 2017-11-30

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