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Screening for Antepartum Depression Through Community Health Outreach in Swaziland
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Siphilile Maternal & Child Hlth NGO, Matsapha, Swaziland; Church Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden. (Internationell barnhälsa och nutrition/Mårtensson)
University College London, London, UK.
Siphilile Maternal and Child Health (NGO), Matsapha, Swaziland.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
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2016 (English)In: Journal of community health, ISSN 0094-5145, E-ISSN 1573-3610, Vol. 41, no 5, 946-952 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Maternal depression, including antepartum and postpartum depression, is a neglected public health issue with potentially far-reaching effects on maternal and child health. We aimed to measure the burden of antepartum depression and identify risk factors among women in a peri-urban community in Swaziland. We conducted a cross-sectional study within the context of a community outreach peer support project involving "Mentor Mothers". We used of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to screen women for depression during the third trimester of pregnancy, using a cut-off score of ≥13 to indicate depression. We also collected demographic and socioeconomic factors, and assessed the association of these factors with EPDS score using logistic regression models. A total of 1038 pregnant women were screened over a period of 9 months. Almost a quarter (22.7 %) had EPDS scores ≥13 and 41.2 % were HIV positive. A fifth, 17.5 % were teenagers and 73.7 % were unemployed. Depression was not associated with HIV status, age or employment status. However, women with multiple socioeconomic stressors were found to be more likely to score highly on the EPDS. Depression was common among pregnant women in the peri-urban areas of Swaziland. Screening for depression using the EPDS is feasible and can be included in the community health worker standard tool box as a way to improve early detection of depression and to highlight the importance of maternal mental health as a core public health concern.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 41, no 5, 946-952 p.
Keyword [en]
Antepartum depression; EPDS; Community health; Swaziland
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280964DOI: 10.1007/s10900-016-0175-9ISI: 000382682100007PubMedID: 26942766OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-280964DiVA: diva2:912410
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2016-03-16 Created: 2016-03-16 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved

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