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High or increasing levels of physical activity protect women from future insomnia
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy. (Behavioural medicine and physiotherapy)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7999-6087
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
2017 (English)In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 32, 22-27 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: There is a lack of evidence about the impact of physical activity on insomnia based on representative samples with a long-term follow-up. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of physical activity on insomnia incidence, as well as the impact of changes in leisure-time physical activity on insomnia in women. Method: The study included a population-based sample of 5062 women aged >20 years who responded to questionnaires in 2000 and 2010. Insomnia was defined as experiencing severe or very severe problems in falling asleep, maintaining sleep, or experiencing early morning awakenings, together with daytime sleepiness or fatigue. Physical activity was categorized as low, medium, or high level at baseline and at follow-up. Results: After adjusting for age, body mass index, smoking, alcohol dependence, snoring status, level of education, and psychological distress, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval) for incident insomnia in women who increased from a low to a medium or high level of physical activity was 0.53 (0.3 e0.94) and 0.17 (0.03e0.81), respectively, as compared to women with a low activity level on both occasions. Women remaining on a medium activity level or increasing to a high activity level had an OR of 0.53 (0.35 e0.83) and 0.36 (0.21e0.64) and the OR of those decreasing from a high level to a medium level or remaining on a high activity level on both occasions was 0.37 (0.21e0.66) and 0.3 (0.16e0.54) respectively. Conclusion: Women maintaining higher levels or increasing their level of leisure-time physical activity over the 10-year period were partly protected from self-reported insomnia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 32, 22-27 p.
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-281463DOI: 10.1016/j.sleep.2016.03.017ISI: 000400211300005PubMedID: 28366337OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-281463DiVA: diva2:914461
Available from: 2016-03-24 Created: 2016-03-24 Last updated: 2017-06-20Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Physical activity and eating behaviour in sleep disorders
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical activity and eating behaviour in sleep disorders
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Sleep-disordered breathing and insomnia are common sleep disorders and associated with an increased risk of morbidity. The aim of this thesis was to study the contribution of a behavioural sleep medicine perspective on sleep-disordered breathing and insomnia. More specific, factors considered important for changing eating behaviour and the impact of physical activity were studied.

Methods: In study I, semi-structured interviews of participants with obstructive sleep apnoea and obesity (n = 15) were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. A population-based female cohort was followed prospectively over ten years in study II and III using a postal questionnaire on two occasions (n = 4,851 and n = 5062, respectively). In study IV, a series of five experimental single-case studies was conducted testing how an aerobic exercise intervention affected selected typical snores, following an A1B1A2B2A3 design over nine days and nights (n = 5).

Results:  Facilitators and barriers towards eating behaviour change were identified. A low level of self-reported leisure-time physical activity was a risk factor among women for future habitual snoring complaints, independent of weight, weight gain alcohol dependence or smoking. Maintaining higher levels or increasing levels of leisure-time physical activity over the ten-year period partly protected from snoring complaints (study II). Further, a low level of self-reported leisure-time physical activity is a risk factor for future insomnia among women. Maintaining higher levels or increasing levels of leisure-time physical activity over the ten-year period partly protect against self-reported insomnia, independent of psychological distress, age, change in body mass index, smoking, alcohol dependence, snoring status or level of education (study III). Single bouts of aerobic exercise did not produce an acute effect on snoring the following nights in the studied individuals. A pronounced night-to-night variation in snoring was identified (study IV).

Conclusion: Women with sleep disorders would benefit from a behavioural sleep medicine perspective targeting their physical activity in the prevention and management of snoring and insomnia. This is motivated by the protective effects of physical activity confirmed by this thesis.

Knowledge was added about facilitators and barriers for future eating behaviour change interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2016. 63 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1283
Keyword
Health behaviour, obesity, sleep-disordered breathing, sleep disorders, public health, diet, physical activity, snoring, insomnia, risk factors, epidemiology
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308395 (URN)978-91-554-9771-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-01-13, Gunnesalen, Psykiatriens hus ingång 10, Uppsala, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-12-21 Created: 2016-11-25 Last updated: 2016-12-21

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Spörndly-Nees, SørenÅsenlöf, PernillaLindberg, Eva

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