uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Visual tracking in very preterm infants at 4 months predicts neurodevelopment at 3 years of age
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 6
2016 (English)In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 80, no 1, 35-42 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Typically developing infants track moving objects with eye and head movements in a smooth and predictive way at 4 mo of age, but this ability is delayed in very preterm infants. We hypothesized that visual tracking ability in very preterm infants predicts later neurodevelopment. METHOD: In 67 very preterm infants (gestational age<32wk), eye and head movements were assessed at 4 mo corrected age while the infant tracked a moving object. Gaze gain, smooth pursuit, head movements, and timing of gaze relative the object were analyzed off line. Results of the five subscales included in the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID-III) at 3 y of age were evaluated in relation to the visual tracking data and to perinatal risk factors. RESULTS: Significant correlations were obtained between gaze gain and cognition, receptive and expressive language, and fine motor function, respectively, also after controlling for gestational age, severe brain damage, retinopathy of prematurity, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. CONCLUSION: This is the first study demonstrating that the basic ability to visually track a moving object at 4 mo robustly predicts neurodevelopment at 3 y of age in children born very preterm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 80, no 1, 35-42 p.
National Category
Psychology Pediatrics Ophthalmology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284105DOI: 10.1038/pr.2016.37ISI: 000379377900006PubMedID: 27027722OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-284105DiVA: diva2:919815
Available from: 2016-04-15 Created: 2016-04-15 Last updated: 2017-11-30

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Kaul, Ylva FredrikssonRosander, KerstinHofsten, von, ClaesBrodd, Katarina StrandHolmström, GerdHellström-Westas, Lena

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kaul, Ylva FredrikssonRosander, KerstinHofsten, von, ClaesBrodd, Katarina StrandHolmström, GerdHellström-Westas, Lena
By organisation
PediatricsDepartment of PsychologyCentrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD)Ophthalmology
In the same journal
Pediatric Research
PsychologyPediatricsOphthalmology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 620 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf