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Early recognition of absorption challenges of contemporary targets:: key molecular properties and in silico tools
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy. (Drug delivery)ORCID iD: 289172612
2013 (English)In: Bulletin Technique Gattefossé, Vol. 106, 50-57 p.Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Oral route is the preferred option for the administration of small molecules due to convenience and good patient compliance. For absorption to occur, a drug compound needs to be dissolved in the gastrointestinal fluid to permeate the intestinal membrane. In recent times large efforts have been directed towards solubility enhancing strategies due to the poor solubility profile of the current pipeline of pharmaceutical companies. The reasons for the poor solubility, from a molecular perspective, are related to whether the compound has a solid-state limited or solvation limited solubility. Recent studies indicate that rather simple characterization of a molecule, including calculated molecular properties such as lipophilicity, charge, flexibility, planarity and size can provide information of whether the solubility is restricted by the strong crystal lattice or by poor hydration. Early assessment of these properties will allow the processes which limit solubility to be considered during the early formulation discussions, ultimately guiding toward optimal formulation approaches for new chemical entities (NCEs). Recently, it was shown that it is possible to predict, from molecular structure alone, i) the glass-forming ability of molecules (as an indicator of the possibility to manipulate the solid state as a means to increase dissolution rate/apparent solubility) and ii) drug solubility in commonly used pharmaceutical lipids (as an indicator of the possibility of utilizing lipids to increase the dissolved amount NCE delivered to the intestine). Through approaches like these, the future of formulation design will be transformed from experimental screening efforts to predictive science, allowing better understanding of the molecular interactions that result in successful performance in vivo.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 106, 50-57 p.
National Category
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284953OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-284953DiVA: diva2:921024
Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2017-05-04Bibliographically approved

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Bergström, Christel A S

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