uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Legitimacy in the Business Network Context
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2795-7630
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
2016 (English)In: Extending the Business Network Approach: New Territories, New Technologies, New Terms / [ed] Peter Thilenius, Cecilia Pahlberg, Virpi Havila, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, 301-314 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Perceptions of uncertainty can be significantly reduced by establishing trust within relationships as well as by the manner public view an organisation as legitimate. One of the most important aspects when explaining business-to-business interaction is the organisational relationship. Within the network approach, relationships are defined as developing over time, resulting in a number of adaptations and roles (IMP Group 2002: 22) which consequently become institutionalised within the relationship. Such institutionalisation concerns activities between the actors and may require substantial adaptation relating to internal organisational processes within each firm. Interactions between entities form rules and expectations for what constitutes an accepted behaviour; therefore the legitimacy concept is essential to consider in relationships. Legitimacy is a perception held by a beholder based on either direct or indirect relationships, as well as upon reputation. It is founded on different constituents’ expectations, perceptions, evaluations and judgments of the firm as being trustworthy, credible, desirable, proper or appropriate (Suchman 1995). Sharma (1991), over two decades ago, stated that without legitimacy the network will not be willing to supply resources. Furthermore, the concept of legitimacy has been widely discussed by researchers within institutional theory (cf., Human and Provan 2000; Meyer and Rowan 1991), recently regaining interest among various network researchers including, the analysis of foreign market entry (cf., Gebert-Persson and Káptalan-Nagy 2009; Jansson et al. 2007; Low and Johnston 2010), regional strategic networks (Gebert-Persson et al. 2010) and firms acting within political contexts (Hadjikhani 1998). However, these studies have primarily perceived legitimacy as a resource that can be drawn upon or affecting how actors are perceived.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 301-314 p.
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292795DOI: 10.1057/978-1-137-53765-2_17Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84978356978ISBN: 978-113753765-2 (pdf) ISBN: 978-113753763-8 (print) OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-292795DiVA: diva2:926661
Available from: 2016-05-09 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2016-12-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gebert-Persson, SabineKaptalan-Nagy, Enikö
By organisation
Department of Business Studies
Business Administration

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 229 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf