uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
The stiff upper LIP: investigating the High Arctic Large Igneous Province
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics. Uppsala University. (CEMPEG)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics. (CEMPEG)
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Geology Today, ISSN 0266-6979, E-ISSN 1365-2451, Vol. 32, no 3, 92-98 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [en]

The Canadian Arctic Islands expose a complex network of dykes and sills that belong to the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP), which intruded volatile-rich sedimentary rocks of the Sverdrup Basin (shale, limestone, sandstone and evaporite) some 130 to 120 million years ago. There is thus great potential in studying the HALIP to learn how volatile-rich sedimentary rocks respond to magmatic heating events during LIP emplacement. The HALIP remains, however, one of the least well known LIPs on the planet due to its remote location, short field season, and harsh climate. A Canadian–Swedish team of geologists set out in summer 2015 to further explore HALIP sills and their sedimentary host rocks, including the sampling of igneous and meta-sedimentary rocks for subsequent geochemical analysis, and high pressure-temperature petrological experiments to help define the actual processes and time-scales of magma–sediment interaction. The research results will advance our understanding of how climate-active volatiles such as CO2, SO2 and CH4 are mobilised during the magma–sediment interaction related to LIP events, a process which is hypothesised to have drastically affected Earth's carbon and sulphur cycles. In addition, assimilation of sulphate evaporites, for example, is anticipated to trigger sulphide immiscibility in the magma bodies and in so doing could promote the formation of Ni-PGE ore bodies. Here we document the joys and challenges of ‘frontier arctic fieldwork’ and discuss some of our initial observations from the High Arctic Large Igneous Province.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 32, no 3, 92-98 p.
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-293548DOI: 10.1111/gto.12138OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-293548DiVA: diva2:927941
Funder
Swedish Polar Research SecretariatSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-05-13 Created: 2016-05-13 Last updated: 2016-05-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Deegan, FrancesTroll, ValentinGeiger, Harri
By organisation
Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics
In the same journal
Geology Today
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 93 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link