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Insulin-like growth factor I and risk of incident cancer in elderly men - results from MrOS (Osteoporotic Fractures in Men) in Sweden
Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad CBAR, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Gothenburg, Sweden..
Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad CBAR, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Gothenburg, Sweden..
Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Appl Biostat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed & Clin Sci, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden..
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2016 (English)In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 84, no 5, 764-770 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

ObjectiveStudies of the association between circulating IGF-I and cancer risk have shown conflicting results. We have previously observed a U-shaped association between IGF-I and cancer mortality. This study test the hypotheses of a U-shaped association between IGF-I and incident cancer. DesignElderly men (2368), randomly recruited from the general community. MethodsIGF-I was measured in a cohort of elderly men. Complete data for incident cancer were obtained from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Statistical analyses included Cox proportional hazards regressions with or without a spline approach. ResultsThree hundred and sixty-nine participants had incident cancer after baseline. Prostate cancer was most frequent (n = 140). There was no association between serum IGF-I and all cancer or prostate cancer incidence. However, there was a nonlinear association between IGF-I and nonprostate cancer incidence (P = <005). Exploratory analyses were performed for low and high serum IGF-I (quintiles 1 and 5) vs intermediate (quintiles 2-4, referent). There was a tendency of increased nonprostate cancer risk in men with high IGF-I (HR = 126, 95% confidence interval (CI): 092-171, P = 015). After excluding participants with follow-up of less than 26 years (half median follow-up time), to control for potential diagnostic delay, the association was statistically significant (HR = 155, CI: 103-235). ConclusionThere was a significant nonlinear association between IGF-I and nonprostate cancer. No association between IGF-I and prostate cancer was observed. Future studies are warranted to further investigate this nonlinear association, including whether IGF-I concentration is a reproducible, and useful, risk marker of nonprostate cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 84, no 5, 764-770 p.
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Clinical Medicine
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-294648DOI: 10.1111/cen.12962ISI: 000373740400018PubMedID: 26440042OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-294648DiVA: diva2:932704
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research Magnus Bergvall FoundationTorsten Söderbergs stiftelseÅke Wiberg FoundationSwedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)
Available from: 2016-06-02 Created: 2016-05-26 Last updated: 2016-06-02Bibliographically approved

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