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Antagonistic natural and sexual selection on wing shape in a scrambling damselfly
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, ON M5S 3B2, Canada;Evolutionary Ecology Unit, Biology Department, Lund University, SE223-62 Lund, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
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2016 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 70, no 7, 1582-1595 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wings are a key trait underlying the evolutionary success of birds, bats, and insects. For over a century, researchers have studiedthe form and function of wings to understand the determinants of flight performance. However, to understand the evolutionof flight, we must comprehend not only how morphology affects performance, but also how morphology and performanceaffect fitness. Natural and sexual selection can either reinforce or oppose each other, but their role in flight evolution remainspoorly understood. Here, we show that wing shape is under antagonistic selection with regard to sexual and natural selectionin a scrambling damselfly. In a field setting, natural selection (survival) favored individuals with long and slender forewings andshort and broad hindwings. In contrast, sexual selection (mating success) favored individuals with short and broad forewings andnarrow-based hindwings. Both types of selection favored individuals of intermediate size. These results suggest that individualsface a trade-off between flight energetics and maneuverability and demonstrate how natural and sexual selection can operate insimilar directions for some wing traits, that is, wing size, but antagonistically for others, that is, wing shape. Furthermore, theyhighlight the need to study flight evolution within the context of species’ mating systems and mating behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 70, no 7, 1582-1595 p.
Keyword [en]
Lestes sponsa, mark–recapture, mating success, survival
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-295167DOI: 10.1111/evo.12951ISI: 000380023200013PubMedID: 27173835OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-295167DiVA: diva2:933111
Available from: 2016-06-03 Created: 2016-06-03 Last updated: 2016-09-13

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Outomuro, DavidCortázar-Chinarro, MaríaJohansson, Frank
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