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An obesity-associated risk allele within the FTO gene affects human brain activity for areas important for emotion, impulse control and reward in response to food images
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
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2016 (English)In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 43, no 9, 1173-1180 p.Article in journal (Refereed) PublishedText
Abstract [en]

Understanding how genetics influences obesity, brain activity and eating behaviour will add important insight for developing strategies for weight-loss treatment, as obesity may stem from different causes and as individual feeding behaviour may depend on genetic differences. To this end, we examined how an obesity risk allele for the FTO gene affects brain activity in response to food images of different caloric content via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thirty participants homozygous for the rs9939609 single nucleotide polymorphism were shown images of low-or high-calorie food while brain activity was measured via fMRI. In a whole-brain analysis, we found that people with the FTO risk allele genotype (AA) had increased activity compared with the non-risk (TT) genotype in the posterior cingulate, cuneus, precuneus and putamen. Moreover, higher body mass index in the AA genotype was associated with reduced activity to food images in areas important for emotion (cingulate cortex), but also in areas important for impulse control (frontal gyri and lentiform nucleus). Lastly, we corroborate our findings with behavioural scales for the behavioural inhibition and activation systems. Our results suggest that the two genotypes are associated with differential neural processing of food images, which may influence weight status through diminished impulse control and reward processing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 43, no 9, 1173-1180 p.
Keyword [en]
fMRI, food, FTO, obesity, SNP
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-297286DOI: 10.1111/ejn.13177ISI: 000375134800007PubMedID: 26797854OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-297286DiVA: diva2:941548
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilThe Swedish Brain Foundation
Available from: 2016-06-22 Created: 2016-06-22 Last updated: 2016-06-22Bibliographically approved

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Wiemerslage, LyleNilsson, Emil K.Dahlberg, Linda SolstrandBylund, Simon B. A.Hogenkamp, Pleunie S.Bandstein, MarcusTitova, Olga E.Larsson, Elna-MarieBenedict, ChristianSchiöth, Helgi B.
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European Journal of Neuroscience
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