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Late Cretaceous dinosaurian remains from the Kristianstad Basin of southern Sweden
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Australian Age Dinosaurs Nat Hist Museum, Winton, Qld 4735, Australia..
Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Solvegatan 12, SE-22362 Lund, Sweden..
Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Solvegatan 12, SE-22362 Lund, Sweden..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
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2016 (English)In: Mesozoic Biotas Of Scandinavia And Its Arctic Territories, Geological Society, 2016, 231-239 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
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Abstract [en]

Mesozoic dinosaur fossils are exceptionally rare in Scandinavia. The Swedish record is typically depauperate, with the Kristianstad Basin of Skane (Scania) yielding all of the known fossils from Swedish Cretaceous strata. Although highly fragmentary, these body remnants are important because they provide evidence of a relatively diverse fauna, including previously recognized hesperornithiform birds and leptoceratopsid ceratopsians, as well as indeterminate ornithopods that are confirmed here for the first time. In this paper, we describe three phalanges (from Asen) and an incomplete right tibia (from Ugnsmunnarna) from the Kristianstad Basin. One of the phalanges appears to pertain to a leptoceratopsid ceratopsian, providing further evidence of these small ornithischians in the Cretaceous sediments of Sweden. The other two phalanges are interpreted as deriving from small ornithopods similar to Thescelosaurus and Parksosaurus. The tibia appears to represent the first evidence of a non-avian theropod dinosaur in the Cretaceous of Sweden, with a previous report of theropod remains based on fish teeth having been corrected by other authors. The remains described herein provide important additions to the enigmatic dinosaurian fauna that inhabited the Fennoscandian archipelago during the latest Cretaceous.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Geological Society, 2016. 231-239 p.
Series
Geological Society Special Publication, ISSN 0305-8719 ; 434
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-299531DOI: 10.1144/SP434.8ISI: 000377671000013Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84970021313ISBN: 9781862397484 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-299531DiVA: diva2:949651
Available from: 2016-07-22 Created: 2016-07-22 Last updated: 2017-01-03Bibliographically approved

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