uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 376
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    25. Economic Instruments: Three Interlinkages Between Ecology and Economics2012In: Rural Development and Land Use / [ed] Lars Rydén and Ingrid Karlsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 280-293Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    51. The environment2002In: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, p. 639-650Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Abbott, Benjamin
    et al.
    Univ Rennes 1, OSUR, CNRS, ECOBIO,UMR 6553, Rennes, France.
    Baranov, Viktor
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany.
    Mendoza-Lera, Clara
    Ctr LyonVilleurbanne, UR MALY, Irstea, F-69616 Villeurbanne, France.
    Nikolakopoulou, Myrto
    Naturalea, Barcelona, Spain.
    Harjung, Astrid
    Univ Barcelona, E-08007 Barcelona, Spain.
    Kolbe, Tamara
    Univ Rennes 1, CNRS, OSURGeosci Rennes, UMR 6118, F-35014 Rennes, France.
    Balasubramanian, Mukundh
    BioSistemika Ltd, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Vaessen, Timothy N
    CEAB CSIC, Girona, Spain.
    Ciocca, Francesco
    Silixa, Elstree, England.
    Campeau, Audrey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Wallin, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Romeijn, Paul
    Univ Birmingham, Sch Geog Earth & Environm Sci, Birmingham B15 2TT, W Midlands, England.
    Antonelli, Marta
    LIST, Esch Sur Alzette, Luxembourg.
    Goncalves, José
    Natl Inst Biol, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Datry, Thibault
    Ctr LyonVilleurbanne, UR MALY, Irstea, F-69616 Villeurbanne, France.
    Laverman, Anniet
    Univ Rennes 1, OSUR, CNRS, ECOBIO,UMR 6553, Rennes, France.
    de Dreuzý, Jean-Raynald
    Univ Rennes 1, CNRS, OSURGeosci Rennes, UMR 6118, F-35014 Rennes, France.
    David, Hannah M.
    Univ Birmingham, Sch Geog Earth & Environm Sci, Birmingham B15 2TT, W Midlands, England.
    Krause, Stefan
    Univ Birmingham, Sch Geog Earth & Environm Sci, Birmingham B15 2TT, W Midlands, England.
    Oldham, Carolyn
    Univ Western Australia, Civil Environm & Min Engn, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Pinay, Gilles
    Univ Rennes 1, OSUR, CNRS, ECOBIO,UMR 6553, Rennes, France.
    Using multi-tracer inference to move beyond single-catchment ecohydrology2016In: Earth-Science Reviews, ISSN 0012-8252, E-ISSN 1872-6828, Vol. 160, p. 19-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protecting or restoring aquatic ecosystems in the face of growing anthropogenic pressures requires an understanding of hydrological and biogeochemical functioning across multiple spatial and temporal scales. Recent technological and methodological advances have vastly increased the number and diversity of hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological tracers available, providing potentially powerful tools to improve understanding of fundamental problems in ecohydrology, notably: 1. Identifying spatially explicit flowpaths, 2. Quantifying water residence time, and 3. Quantifying and localizing biogeochemical transformation. In this review, we synthesize the history of hydrological and biogeochemical theory, summarize modem tracer methods, and discuss how improved understanding of flowpath, residence time, and biogeochemical transformation can help ecohydrology move beyond description of site-specific heterogeneity. We focus on using multiple tracers with contrasting characteristics (crossing proxies) to infer ecosystem functioning across multiple scales. Specifically, we present how crossed proxies could test recent ecohydrological theory, combining the concepts of hotspots and hot moments with the Damkohler number in what we call the HotDam framework.

  • 4.
    Abbott, Benjamin W.
    et al.
    Univ Rennes 1, OSUR, CNRS, UMR ECOBIO 6553, F-35014 Rennes, France.;Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA.;Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Dept Biology& Wildlife, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Jones, Jeremy B.
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA.;Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Dept Biology& Wildlife, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Schuur, Edward A. G.
    No Arizona Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Sci & Soc, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 USA..
    Chapin, F. Stuart, III
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA.;Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Dept Biology& Wildlife, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Bowden, William B.
    Univ Vermont, Rubenstein Sch Environm & Nat Resources, Burlington, VT 05405 USA..
    Bret-Harte, M. Syndonia
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA.;Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Dept Biology& Wildlife, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Epstein, Howard E.
    Univ Virginia, Dept Environm Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA..
    Flannigan, Michael D.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Renewable Resources, Edmonton, AB T6G 2M7, Canada..
    Harms, Tamara K.
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA.;Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Dept Biology& Wildlife, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Hollingsworth, Teresa N.
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, PNW Res Stn, USDA Forest Serv, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Mack, Michelle C.
    No Arizona Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Sci & Soc, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 USA..
    McGuire, A. David
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska Cooperat Fish & Wildlife Res Unit, US Geol Survey, Anchorage, AK USA..
    Natali, Susan M.
    Woods Hole Res Ctr, Woods Hole, MA USA..
    Rocha, Adrian V.
    Univ Notre Dame, Dept Biol Sci, Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA.;Univ Notre Dame, Environm Change Initiat, Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA..
    Tank, Suzanne E.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Biol Sci, Edmonton, AB T6G 2M7, Canada..
    Turetsky, Merritt R.
    Univ Guelph, Dept Integrat Biol, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada..
    Vonk, Jorien E.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Earth Sci, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Wickland, Kimberly P.
    US Geol Survey, Natl Res Program, Boulder, CO USA..
    Aiken, George R.
    US Geol Survey, Natl Res Program, Boulder, CO USA..
    Alexander, Heather D.
    Mississippi State Univ, Forest & Wildlife Res Ctr, Mississippi State, MS 39762 USA..
    Amon, Rainer M. W.
    Texas A&M Univ, Galveston, TX USA..
    Benscoter, Brian W.
    Florida Atlantic Univ, Boca Raton, FL 33431 USA..
    Bergeron, Yves
    Univ Quebec Abitibi Temiscamingue, Forest Res Inst, Rouyn Noranda, PQ, Canada..
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. wedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, S-90183 Umea, Sweden..
    Blarquez, Olivier
    Univ Montreal, Dept Geog, Montreal, PQ H3C 3J7, Canada..
    Bond-Lamberty, Ben
    Pacific NW Natl Lab, Richland, WA 99352 USA..
    Breen, Amy L.
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Int Arctic Res Ctr, Scenarios Network Alaska & Arctic Planning, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Buffam, Ishi
    Univ Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 USA..
    Cai, Yihua
    Xiamen Univ, State Key Lab Marine Environm Sci, Xiamen, Peoples R China..
    Carcaillet, Christopher
    Ecole Prat Hautes Etud, UMR5023, CNRS Lyon 1, Lyon, France..
    Carey, Sean K.
    McMaster Univ, Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8, Canada..
    Chen, Jing M.
    Univ Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada..
    Chen, Han Y. H.
    Lakehead Univ, Fac Nat Resources Management, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1, Canada..
    Christensen, Torben R.
    Lund Univ, Arctic Res Ctr, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.;Aarhus Univ, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark..
    Cooper, Lee W.
    Univ Maryland, Ctr Environm Sci, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Cornelissen, J. Hans C.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Syst Ecol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    de Groot, William J.
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    DeLuca, Thomas H.
    Univ Washington, Sch Environm & Forest Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Dorrepaal, Ellen
    Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Climate Impacts Res Ctr, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Fetcher, Ned
    Wilkes Univ, Inst Environm Sci & Sustainabil, Wilkes Barre, PA 18766 USA..
    Finlay, Jacques C.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Ecol Evolut & Behav, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Forbes, Bruce C.
    Univ Lapland, Arctic Ctr, Rovaniemi, Finland..
    French, Nancy H. F.
    Michigan Technol Univ, Michigan Tech Res Inst, Houghton, MI 49931 USA..
    Gauthier, Sylvie
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, Laurentian Forestry Ctr, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Girardin, Martin P.
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, Laurentian Forestry Ctr, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Goetz, Scott J.
    Woods Hole Res Ctr, Woods Hole, MA USA..
    Goldammer, Johann G.
    Max Planck Inst Chem, Global Fire Monitoring Ctr, Berlin, Germany..
    Gough, Laura
    Towson Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Towson, MD USA..
    Grogan, Paul
    Queens Univ, Dept Biol, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada..
    Guo, Laodong
    Univ Wisconsin Milwaukee, Sch Freshwater Sci, Milwaukee, WI USA..
    Higuera, Philip E.
    Univ Montana, Dept Ecosyst & Conservat Sci, Missoula, MT 59812 USA..
    Hinzman, Larry
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Hu, Feng Sheng
    Univ Illinois, Dept Plant Biol, Chicago, IL 60680 USA.;Univ Illinois, Dept Geol, Chicago, IL 60680 USA..
    Hugelius, Gustaf
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jafarov, Elchin E.
    Univ Colorado Boulder, Inst Arctic & Alpine Res, Boulder, CO USA..
    Jandt, Randi
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska Fire Sci Consortium, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Johnstone, Jill F.
    Univ Saskatchewan, Dept Biol, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0W0, Canada..
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Climate Impacts Res Ctr, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Kasischke, Eric S.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Geog Sci, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Kattner, Gerhard
    Helmholtz Ctr Polar & Marine Res, Alfred Wegener Inst, Berlin, Germany..
    Kelly, Ryan
    Neptune & Co Inc, North Wales, PA USA..
    Keuper, Frida
    Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Climate Impacts Res Ctr, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;INRA, AgroImpact UPR1158, New York, NY USA..
    Kling, George W.
    Univ Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Kortelainen, Pirkko
    Finnish Environm Inst, Helsinki, Finland..
    Kouki, Jari
    Univ Eastern Finland, Sch Forest Sci, Joensuu, Finland..
    Kuhry, Peter
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Forest Ecol & Management, S-90183 Umea, Sweden..
    Laurion, Isabelle
    Inst Natl Rech Sci, Ctr Eau Terre Environm, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Macdonald, Robie W.
    Inst Ocean Sci, Dept Fisheries & Oceans, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Mann, Paul J.
    Northumbria Univ, Dept Geog, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Martikainen, Pertti J.
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Environm & Biol Sci, Joensuu, Finland..
    McClelland, James W.
    Univ Texas Austin, Inst Marine Sci, Austin, TX 78712 USA..
    Molau, Ulf
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Oberbauer, Steven F.
    Florida Int Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Miami, FL 33199 USA..
    Olefeldt, David
    Univ Alberta, Dept Revewable Resources, Edmonton, AB T6G 2M7, Canada..
    Pare, David
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, Laurentian Forestry Ctr, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Parisien, Marc-Andre
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, No Forestry Ctr, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Payette, Serge
    Univ Laval, Ctr Etud Nord, Quebec City, PQ G1K 7P4, Canada..
    Peng, Changhui
    Univ Quebec, Ctr CEF, ESCER, Montreal, PQ H3C 3P8, Canada.;Northwest A&F Univ, Coll Forestry, State Key Lab Soil Eros & Dryland Farming Loess P, Xian, Peoples R China..
    Pokrovsky, Oleg S.
    CNRS, Georesources & Environm, Toulouse, France.;Tomsk State Univ, BIO GEO CLIM Lab, Tomsk, Russia..
    Rastetter, Edward B.
    Marine Biol Lab, Ctr Ecosyst, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA..
    Raymond, Peter A.
    Yale Univ, Sch Forestry & Environm Studies, New Haven, CT 06520 USA..
    Raynolds, Martha K.
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Rein, Guillermo
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Mech Engn, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Reynolds, James F.
    Lanzhou Univ, Sch Life Sci, Lanzhou 730000, Peoples R China.;Duke Univ, Nicholas Sch Environm, Durham, NC 27706 USA..
    Robards, Martin
    Arctic Beringia Program, Wildlife Conservat Soc, New York, NY USA..
    Rogers, Brendan M.
    Woods Hole Res Ctr, Woods Hole, MA USA..
    Schaedel, Christina
    No Arizona Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Sci & Soc, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 USA..
    Schaefer, Kevin
    Univ Colorado Boulder, Cooperat Inst Res Environm Sci, Natl Snow & Ice Data Ctr, Boulder, CO USA..
    Schmidt, Inger K.
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Geosci & Nat Resource Management, DK-1168 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Shvidenko, Anatoly
    Int Inst Appl Syst Anal, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria.;Sukachev Inst Forest, Moscow, Russia..
    Sky, Jasper
    Cambridge Ctr Climate Change Res, Cambridge, England..
    Spencer, Robert G. M.
    Florida State Univ, Dept Earth Ocean & Atmospher Sci, Tallahassee, FL 32306 USA..
    Starr, Gregory
    Univ Alabama, Dept Biol Sci, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA..
    Striegl, Robert G.
    US Geol Survey, Natl Res Program, Boulder, CO USA..
    Teisserenc, Roman
    Univ Toulouse, CNRS, INPT, ECOLAB,UPS, Toulouse, France..
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Virtanen, Tarmo
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Environm Sci, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Welker, Jeffrey M.
    Univ Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK USA..
    Zimov, Sergei
    Russian Acad Sci, Northeast Sci Stn, Moscow 117901, Russia..
    Biomass offsets little or none of permafrost carbon release from soils, streams, and wildfire: an expert assessment2016In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 034014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the permafrost region warms, its large organic carbon pool will be increasingly vulnerable to decomposition, combustion, and hydrologic export. Models predict that some portion of this release will be offset by increased production of Arctic and boreal biomass; however, the lack of robust estimates of net carbon balance increases the risk of further overshooting international emissions targets. Precise empirical or model-based assessments of the critical factors driving carbon balance are unlikely in the near future, so to address this gap, we present estimates from 98 permafrost-region experts of the response of biomass, wildfire, and hydrologic carbon flux to climate change. Results suggest that contrary to model projections, total permafrost-region biomass could decrease due to water stress and disturbance, factors that are not adequately incorporated in current models. Assessments indicate that end-of-the-century organic carbon release from Arctic rivers and collapsing coastlines could increase by 75% while carbon loss via burning could increase four-fold. Experts identified water balance, shifts in vegetation community, and permafrost degradation as the key sources of uncertainty in predicting future system response. In combination with previous findings, results suggest the permafrost region will become a carbon source to the atmosphere by 2100 regardless of warming scenario but that 65%-85% of permafrost carbon release can still be avoided if human emissions are actively reduced.

  • 5.
    Abeysinghe, Kasun S.
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Xishuangbanna Trop Bot Garden, Key Lab Trop Forest Ecol, Mengla, Yunnan, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Yang, Xiao-Dong
    Chinese Acad Sci, Xishuangbanna Trop Bot Garden, Key Lab Trop Forest Ecol, Mengla, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Goodale, Eben
    Guangxi Univ, Coll Forestry, Nanning, Guangxi, Peoples R China..
    Anderson, Christopher W. N.
    Massey Univ, Inst Agr & Environm, Soil & Earth Sci, Palmerston North, New Zealand..
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cao, Axiang
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geochem, State Key Lab Environm Geochem, Guiyang, Peoples R China.;Guizhou Normal Univ, Sch Chem & Mat Sci, Guiyang, Peoples R China..
    Feng, Xinbin
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geochem, State Key Lab Environm Geochem, Guiyang, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Shengjie
    Chinese Acad Sci, Xishuangbanna Trop Bot Garden, Key Lab Trop Forest Ecol, Mengla, Yunnan, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Mammides, Christos
    Chinese Acad Sci, Xishuangbanna Trop Bot Garden, Key Lab Trop Forest Ecol, Mengla, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Meng, Bo
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geochem, State Key Lab Environm Geochem, Guiyang, Peoples R China..
    Quan, Rui-Chang
    Chinese Acad Sci, Xishuangbanna Trop Bot Garden, Key Lab Trop Forest Ecol, Mengla, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Jing
    Nanjing Agr Univ, Coll Resources & Environm Sci, Nanjing, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Qiu, Guangle
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geochem, State Key Lab Environm Geochem, Guiyang, Peoples R China..
    Total mercury and methylmercury concentrations over a gradient of contamination in earthworms living in rice paddy soil2017In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 1202-1210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mercury (Hg) deposited from emissions or from local contamination, can have serious health effects on humans and wildlife. Traditionally, Hg has been seen as a threat to aquatic wildlife, because of its conversion in suboxic conditions into bioavailable methylmercury (MeHg), but it can also threaten contaminated terrestrial ecosystems. In Asia, rice paddies in particular may be sensitive ecosystems. Earthworms are soil-dwelling organisms that have been used as indicators of Hg bioavailability; however, the MeHg concentrations they accumulate in rice paddy environments are not well known. Earthworm and soil samples were collected from rice paddies at progressive distances from abandoned mercury mines in Guizhou, China, and at control sites without a history of Hg mining. Total Hg (THg) and MeHg concentrations declined in soil and earthworms as distance increased from the mines, but the percentage of THg that was MeHg, and the bioaccumulation factors in earthworms, increased over this gradient. This escalation in methylation and the incursion of MeHg into earthworms may be influenced by more acidic soil conditions and higher organic content further from the mines. In areas where the source of Hg is deposition, especially in water-logged and acidic rice paddy soil, earthworms may biomagnify MeHg more than was previously reported. It is emphasized that rice paddy environments affected by acidifying deposition may be widely dispersed throughout Asia.

  • 6.
    Abrahamsson, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    In situ-metoder för sanering av klorerade lösningsmedel: utvärdering med avseende på svenska förhållanden2015Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, there are 428 areas contaminated with chlorinated solvents in Sweden. These substances have been used in Sweden’s industry as degreasing agents and solvents.Chlorinated solvents are more difficult to investigate and remediate compared to petroleum hydrocarbons, due to their complicated distribution in different media. Hence, it is important to increase the knowledge of remediation of chlorinated solvents. The remediation technology excavation is frequently used in Sweden for contaminated areas. Excavation means that soil is dug up and transported to treatment or landfills sites. Due to its climate impact, the use of more sustainable remediation technologies should be increased.

    This thesis aimed to evaluate in situ remediation technologies for soil and groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents with respect to functionality, sustainability, time and cost aspects. Furthermore, this thesis aimed to investigate which technologies are best suited for Swedish conditions. To evaluate suitability and functionality of remediation technologies,all technologies were described and a case study of five areas in Sweden contaminated with chlorinated solvents was conducted. The contaminant situation and site-specific conditions were described for each area. Thereafter, the evaluation and choice of remediation technology and remediation result were presented. The technologies studied in the case study were two types of chemical reduction, multi-phase extraction, biostimulation and thermal treatment.The five projects were then assessed using the Swedish Geotechnical Institute’s decision support tool for remediation technologies, SAMLA. The technologies were rated in SAMLA according to criteria related to environmental factors, social factors and costs. Furthermore,the remediation technologies were evaluated based on their strengths and limitations with respect to Swedish conditions, such as geology, climate and geochemistry. They were also evaluated based on their strengths and limitations according to implementation areas, cost,remediation time, energy consumption and use in Sweden.The assessment of the five projects in SAMLA produced similar results compared to previously conducted risk evaluations. The technologies that were chosen based on the risk evaluations were also rated highest in SAMLA. The choice of technology for each project was based on conditions for the area, such as geology and existing buildings. Conclusions were drawn indicating that all technologies can be implemented in Sweden with respect to geological conditions. However, site-specific conditions, such as high groundwater flow and heterogeneous soil, limit the implementation of a specific technology. Moreover, other sitespecific conditions than those already discussed have to be considered, for instance buildings or future exploitation. Future development of in situ remediation technologies may focus on implementation of a certain type of geology (highly permeable soils), where chlorinated solvents may be found more frequently.

  • 7.
    Abrahamsson, Elin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Ekelund, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Human Exposure from Mercury in Rice in the Philippines2015Student paper other, 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the western part of the Philippines, in the Palawan province, studies have shown that large quantities of mercury are spread to the surrounding area during heavy rainfall. In addition, mercury is spread to rice fields and bioaccumulated in marine fish and seafood. The mercury originates from the abandoned Palawan Quicksilver Mine. Since mercury is toxic for the human body and new studies have shown that mercury accumulates in rice, it is important to investigate human exposure from mercury in rice.

    This project investigates the total amount of mercury and methylmercury (MeHg) accumulated in rice, soil and water from four different rice fields in Palawan. The soil samples have been taken directly from the fields and water samples have been taken from nearby streams and springs. Rice grains harvested earlier this year from the same fields have been collected from farmers. The soil, water and rice samples were analyzed in Manila and rice samples were as well analyzed in Sweden and China. Furthermore, this project contains a dietary survey and calculation of daily exposure values of MeHg. The survey investigates how often people eat fish and rice and if they have dental amalgam. It also investigates possible health problems related to mercury exposure from rice and fish consumption.

    The analyses from China show that rice samples from all barangays contain total mercury and MeHg. Analyses from Sweden also show that rice from the barangays contains total mercury but the levels were found to be higher than the ones analyzed in China. Furthermore, the health problems found in the diet survey were hard to relate to mercury exposure from rice since the health problems can be caused by other factors. When calculating daily exposure values, the values were found to be as high as the recommended maximum acceptable daily intake in one of the barangays. There might therefore be a risk of eating rice from these four barangays. It is important to consider that these daily exposure values were only based on MeHg exposure from rice consumption, not taking dental amalgam and fish consumption into consideration. This means that the daily exposure values might be even higher than the ones calculated in this study.

  • 8. Agerstrand, Marlene
    et al.
    Berg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Bjorlenius, Berndt
    Breitholtz, Magnus
    Brunström, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Fick, Jerker
    Gunnarsson, Lina
    Larsson, D. G. Joakim
    Sumpter, John P.
    Tysklind, Mats
    Ruden, Christina
    Improving Environmental Risk Assessment of Human Pharmaceuticals2015In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 5336-5345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents 10 recommendations for improving the European Medicines Agency's guidance for environmental risk assessment of human pharmaceutical products. The recommendations are based on up-to-date, available science in combination with experiences from other chemical frameworks such as the REACH-legislation for industrial chemicals. The recommendations concern: expanding the scope of the current guideline; requirements to assess the risk for development of antibiotic resistance; jointly performed assessments; refinement of the test proposal; mixture toxicity assessments on active pharmaceutical ingredients with similar modes of action; use of all available ecotoxicity studies; mandatory reviews; increased transparency; inclusion of emission data from production; and a risk management option. We believe that implementation of our recommendations would strengthen the protection of the environment and be beneficial to society. Legislation and guidance documents need to be updated at regular intervals in order to incorporate new knowledge from the scientific community. This is particularly important for regulatory documents concerning pharmaceuticals in the environment since this is a research field that has been growing substantially in the last decades.

  • 9.
    Ahlgren, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Organic Phosphorus Compounds in Aquatic Sediments: Analysis, Abundance and Effects2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus (P) is often the limiting nutrient in lacustrine and brackish eco-systems, and enhanced input of P into an aquatic system might therefore negatively impact the environment. Because modern waste water manage-ment have reduced external P input to surface waters, internal P loading from the sediment has become one of the main P sources to aquatic ecosys-tems, in which relatively unknown organic P compounds seem to be more active in P recycling than previously thought.

    This thesis focus is on improving analysis methods for organic P com-pounds in lacustrine and brackish sediments, as well as determining which of these compounds might be degraded, mobilized and subsequently recycled to the water column and on what temporal scale this occur. In both lacustrine and brackish environments, the most labile P compound was pyrophosphate, followed by different phosphate diesters. Phosphate monoesters were the least labile organic P compounds and degraded the slowest with sediment depth. In regulated lakes, it was shown that pyrophosphate and polyphos-phate compound groups were most related to lake trophic status, thus indi-cating their involvement in P cycling. This thesis also indicates faster P turn-over in sediment from the brackish environment compared to sediment from the lacustrine environment.

    A comparison of organic P extraction procedures showed that pre-extraction with EDTA, and NaOH as main extractant, was most efficient for total P extraction. Using buffered sodium dithionite (BD) as a pre-extractant and NaOH as main extractant was most efficient for extracting the presuma-bly most labile organic P compound groups, pyrophosphate and polyphos-phate. Furthermore, it was determined that organic P compounds associated with humic substances were more recalcitrant than other P compounds, that the BD step used in traditional P fractionation might extract phosphate monoesters, and that NMR is a statistically valid method for quantification of organic P compounds in sediment extracts.

    List of papers
    1. Depth attenuation of biogenic phosphorus compounds in lake sediment measured by 31P NMR
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depth attenuation of biogenic phosphorus compounds in lake sediment measured by 31P NMR
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 867-872Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94212 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-03-31 Created: 2006-03-31 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    2. Characterization of phosphorus in sequential extracts from lake sediments using P-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of phosphorus in sequential extracts from lake sediments using P-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 0706-652X, E-ISSN 1205-7533, Vol. 63, no 8, p. 1686-1699Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus (P) compounds in three different lake surface sediments were extracted by sequential P extraction and identified by P-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (P-31 NMR) spectroscopy. The extraction procedure primarily discriminates between inorganic P-binding sites but most extraction steps also contained P not reacting (nrP) with the molybdenum complex during P analyses. In all three lakes, the nrP dominated in the NaOH extracts. Nonreactive P from the dystrophic lake was dominated by potentially recalcitrant P groups such as orthophosphate monoesters, while the nrP in the two more productive lakes also contained polyphosphates, pyrophosphate, and organic P groups such as P lipids and DNA-P that may be important in remineralization and recycling to the water column. In addition, polyphosphates showed substantial dynamics in settling seston. The Humic-P pools (P associated with humic acids) showed strong signals of orthophosphate monoesters in all three lakes, which supported the assumption that P-containing humic compounds are indeed recovered in this fraction, although other organic P forms are also present. Thus, in addition to expanding the understanding of which organic P forms that are present in lake sediments, the P-31 NMR technique also demonstrated that the chemical extraction procedure may provide some quantification of recalcitrant versus labile organic P forms.

    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94213 (URN)10.1139/F06-070 (DOI)000239655100003 ()
    Available from: 2006-03-31 Created: 2006-03-31 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Degradation of organic phosphorus compounds in anoxic Baltic Sea sediments: A P-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Degradation of organic phosphorus compounds in anoxic Baltic Sea sediments: A P-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 2341-2348Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The composition and abundance of phosphorus extracted by NaOH-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid from anoxic Northwest Baltic Sea sediment was characterized and quantified using solution P-31 nuclear magnetic resonance. Extracts from sediment depths down to 55 cm, representing 85 yr of deposition, contained 18.5 g m(-2) orthophosphate. Orthophosphate monoesters, teichoic acid P, microbial P lipids, DNA P, and pyrophosphate corresponded to 6.7, 0.3, 1.1, 3.0, and 0.03 g P m(-2), respectively. The degradability of these compound groups was estimated by their decline in concentration with sediment depth. Pyrophosphate had the shortest half-life (3 yr), followed by microbial P lipids with a half-life of 5 yr, DNA P (8 yr), and orthophosphate monoesters (16 yr). No decline in concentration with sediment depth was observed for orthophosphate or teichoic acid P.

    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94214 (URN)000240673800036 ()
    Available from: 2006-03-31 Created: 2006-03-31 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Biogenic phosphorus in oligotrophic mountain lake sediments: Differences in composition measured with NMR spectroscopy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biogenic phosphorus in oligotrophic mountain lake sediments: Differences in composition measured with NMR spectroscopy
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 40, no 20, p. 3705-3712Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus (P) composition in alkaline sediment extracts from three Swedish oligotrophic mountain lakes was investigated using P-31-NMR spectroscopy. Surface sediments from one natural lake and two mature reservoirs, one of which has received nutrient additions over the last 3 years, were compared with respect to biogenic P composition. The results show significant differences in the occurrence of labile and biogenic P species in the sediments of the different systems. The P compound groups that varied most between these three systems were pyrophosphate and polyphosphates, compound groups known to play an important role in sediment P recycling. The content of these compound groups was lowest in the reservoirs and may indicate a coupling between anthropogenic disturbances (i.e., impoundment) to a water system and the availability of labile P species in the sediment. A statistical study was also conducted to determine the accuracy and reliability of using P-31-NMR spectroscopy for quantification of sediment P forms.

    Keywords
    phosphorus species, P-31-NMR spectroscopy, reservoirs, oligotrophication, method validation, P-31-NMR accuracy
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94215 (URN)10.1016/j.watres.2006.09.006 (DOI)000242988600005 ()17070896 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2006-03-31 Created: 2006-03-31 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    5. Degradation rates of organic phosphorus in lake sediment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Degradation rates of organic phosphorus in lake sediment
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 15-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus (P) binding groups were identified in phytoplankton, settling particles, and sediment profiles by 31P NMR spectroscopy from the Swedish mesotrophic Lake Erken. The 31P NMR analysis revealed that polyphosphates and pyrophosphates were abundant in the water column, but rapidly mineralized in the sediment. Orthophosphate monoesters and teichoic acids degraded more slowly than DNA-P, polyphosphates, and P lipids. Humic acids and organic acids from phytoplankton were precipitated from the NaOH extract by acidification and identified by 31P NMR spectroscopy. The precipitated P was significantly more recalcitrant than the P compound groups remaining in solution, but does not constitute a major sink of P as it did not reach a stable concentration with depth, which indicates that it may eventually be degraded. Since P also precipitated from phytoplankton, the origin of humic-P can not be related solely to allochthonous P.

    Keywords
    Organic P, 31P NMR, Lake sediment, Degradation rates
    National Category
    Biological Sciences Chemical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97627 (URN)10.1007/s10533-006-9049-z (DOI)000244070900002 ()
    Available from: 2008-10-15 Created: 2008-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    6. Sediment Phosphorus Extractants for Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis: A Quantitative Evaluation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sediment Phosphorus Extractants for Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis: A Quantitative Evaluation
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Quality, ISSN 0047-2425, E-ISSN 1537-2537, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 892-898Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of pre-extractant, extractant, and post-extractant on total extracted amounts of P and organic P compound groups measured with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) in lacustrine sediment was examined. The main extractants investigated were sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium hydroxide ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (NaOH-EDTA) with bicarbonate buffered dithionite (BD) or EDTA as pre-extractants. Post extractions were conducted using either NaOH or NaOH-EDTA, depending on the main extractant. Results showed that the most efficient combination of extractants for total P yield was NaOH with EDTA as pre-extractant, yielding almost 50% more than the second best procedure. The P compound groups varying the most between the different extraction procedures were polyphosphates and pyrophosphates. NaOH with BD as pre-extractant was the most efficient combination for these compound groups.

    National Category
    Chemical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94217 (URN)10.2134/jeq2006.0235 (DOI)000246430500028 ()17485721 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2006-03-31 Created: 2006-03-31 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
  • 10.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Jagerbrand, Annika K.
    VTI, Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst, S-10215 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Molau, Ulf
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Testing reliability of short-term responses to predict longer-term responses of bryophytes and lichens to environmental change2015In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 58, p. 77-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental changes are predicted to have severe and rapid impacts on polar and alpine regions. At high latitudes/altitudes, cryptogams such as bryophytes and lichens are of great importance in terms of biomass, carbon/nutrient cycling, cover and ecosystem functioning. This seven-year factorial experiment examined the effects of fertilizing and experimental warming on bryophyte and lichen abundance in an alpine meadow and a heath community in subarctic Sweden. The aim was to determine whether shortterm responses (five years) are good predictors of longer-term responses (seven years). Fertilizing and warming had significant negative effects on total and relative abundance of bryophytes and lichens, with the largest and most rapid decline caused by fertilizing and combined fertilizing and warming. Bryophytes decreased most in the alpine meadow community, which was bryophyte-dominated, and lichens decreased most in the heath community, which was lichen-dominated. This was surprising, as the most diverse group in each community was expected to be most resistant to perturbation. Warming alone had a delayed negative impact. Of the 16 species included in statistical analyses, seven were significantly negatively affected. Overall, the impacts of simulated warming on bryophytes and lichens as a whole and on individual species differed in time and magnitude between treatments and plant communities (meadow and heath). This will likely cause changes in the dominance structures over time. These results underscore the importance of longer-term studies to improve the quality of data used in climate change models, as models based on short-term data are poor predictors of long-term responses of bryophytes and lichens.

  • 11.
    Albihn, Ann
    et al.
    National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Hans
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    O’Hara Ruiz, Marilyn
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    38. Preparing for Climate Change2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 311-328Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Alsmyr, Michaela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Utvärdering av lufthalts- och nedfallsmätningar gjorda vid Korsnäsverken: Samband mellan miljöförbättrande arbete i pappers- och massaindustrin och föroreningar i närområdet2013Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A decline has been seen in Sweden and Europe when it comes to air pollution the last decades. The decline is partly due to reduced emissions from industries, switching from heating using oil and coal boilers to district heating and better fuel quality. This study evaluates deposition and air concentration measurements made in the vicinity of the pulp and paper industry Korsnäs in Gävle. The measurement series starts at the late 1970s and goes up to year-end 2009/2010. Deposition of dust, sulphate, sodium, calcium and air concentrations of sulphur dioxide and soot were studied. Comparisons were made with Korsnäs environmental measures and emissions during the same time period and with other measurements made in Sweden and Gävleborgs County.

    The study showed a decrease in sulphur dioxide concentrations in the air. This fits well with a major reduction of sulphur emissions from the factory area in the early 1990s when installations of treatment plants were made at the largest emission sources of sulphur dioxide. Reducing the sulphur content of fuel oil from Karskär Energi AB, an energy combine owned by Korsnäs in the same factory area, contributed to the decrease during the same time period. Air concentrations of soot showed no downward trend over the years, but were seasonal, with higher average soot concentrations in the winter. This was most likely caused by the burning of fuel oil from both the private sector and Karskär Energi AB. The largest air concentrations did not show higher levels of sulphur dioxide and soot when the mean wind direction was easterly and thus blew from factory area toward the monitoring station but when the wind direction was southwesterly and blew from inland. The total dust and calcium deposition showed no decline but had higher average measured levels in the summer. Sulphate deposition showed high levels during the late 1980s but has thereafter decreased. The sodium deposition decreased a little during the time period. No clear connection was found between deposition/air concentrations and emissions from the factory area when the data series were sorted by wind direction, wind speed and after the summer and winter months. Depositions and air concentrations were not higher except for sulphur dioxide when the comparison was made with other measurements in Sweden and Gävleborg County. All measurements were below the then current national limits.

  • 13.
    Anderson, Kevin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala. Univ Manchester, Energy & Climate Change, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Peters, Glen
    Ctr Int Climate & Environm Res, Oslo, Norway..
    Act now, not tomorrow2016In: New scientist (1971), ISSN 0262-4079, Vol. 232, no 3098, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Anderson, Kevin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala. Univ Manchester, Tyndall Ctr, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England..
    Peters, Glen
    Ctr Int Climate & Environm Res Oslo CICERO, N-0318 Oslo, Norway..
    The promise of negative emissions Response2016In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 354, no 6313, p. 714-715Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Hagberg, Jeannette
    Weidner, Helmut
    Social Science Research Center, Berlin.
    Jänicke, Martin
    Social Science Research Center, Berlin.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Semeniene, Daiva
    Ministry of Environment, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    22. Making and Implementing Environmental Policy2003In: Environmental Science: Understanding, protecting and managing the environment in the Baltic Sea Region / [ed] Lars Rydén, Pawel Migula and Magnus Andersson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, p. 662-689Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Tol, Richard S.J.
    Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg.
    Graham, L. Phil
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute.
    Bergström, Sten
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Azar, Christian
    University of Gothenburg.
    10. Impacts on the Global Atmosphere: Climate Change and Ozone Depletion2003In: Environmental Science: Understanding, protecting and managing the environment in the Baltic Sea Region / [ed] Lars Rydén, Pawel Migula and Magnus Andersson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, p. 294-323Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Andersson, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, Centre for Environment and Development Studies.
    Att samverka för hållbar utveckling: Om Cemus mötesplats och universitetets ansvar att inspirera till förändring2010In: Över gränserna: om Cemus utbildning för förändring / [ed] Hald, Matilda, Uppsala: CEMUS/CSD Uppsala , 2010, p. 39-47Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Angelstam, Per
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Elbakidze, Marine
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences,.
    Tikhomirov, Valery
    Belarusian State University, Minsk, Belarus.
    15. Forests and Forestry in three Eastern European Countries2012In: Rural Development and Land Use / [ed] Lars Rydén and Ingrid Karlsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 176-185Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Ansnaes, Karl-Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Falu gruva och hållbar utveckling2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Falu Copper Mine and Sustainable Development

    Karl-Markus Ansnaes

    Falu copper mine was Sweden’s oldest mine industry which lasted for almost a thousand years. Throughout the history its area has been vastly contaminated by sulfur oxide. The contaminations has created the mining area to an environmental risk zone which has the ability to spread out into the Falu River. The river has its connections to the Dal River which is discharging towards its mouth in the Baltic Sea. In the year 1968 the first measurement from the polluted Falu River took place. Its metal content came from the mining area, although the decontamination expenses were too high for the running company Stora Kopparbergs Bergsslag AB to pay which then led to conflicts with the Environmental Protection Agency of Sweden on terms none of them could agree on. It was not until the year 1983 when they both agreed on a cooperation which contained of continuing measurements until a suffi-cient decontamination method could be applied. The cooperation was named Projekt Falu gruva. The first obligation was to improve the sewage plant in Främby by con-necting the contaminated water from the mining area with the waste water though a chemical treatment. In the year 1987 the treatment successfully began and the same year the Swedish government financed a delegation, called Dalälvsdelegationen, and its purpose was to decontaminate the pollutions along the Dal River. The delegation’s research led to three reports which contained the areas involved in the river’s pollu-tion as well how the mining area would be treated. In 1992 the Country Administra-tive Board of Dalarna, the Environmental Authority of Falun Municipality, the Environ-mental Protection Agency of Sweden and Stora Kopparbergs Bergsslag AB began cooperation in order to treat the polluted area of Falu copper mine. This cooperation became a project called Faluprojektet. The project consisted of three decontamina-tion priorities with different treatments in the area. The first decontamination priority resulted in a reducing amount of the polluted mining water by 80 % in the Falu River. The second and the third decontamination priorities had some issues during its treat-ment due to new environmental laws influenced in 1999 and the recognition from UNESCO as this area was since 2001 a world cultural heritage. Both the law and the recognition stated that it was forbidden to remove the waste on the ground from the area since it was a part of the cultural protection. This meant the waste was removed closer to the mine pit and became part of a slower and natural hydrological treatment which caused the sulfur dioxide penetrating into the ground. By doing this type pf treatment it reflects upon the environmental quality goals which Sweden is aiming for in order to reach for sustainable development.

  • 20.
    Apler, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Geological Survey of Sweden.
    Dispersal and environmental impact of contaminants in organic rich, fibrous sediments of industrial origin in the Baltic Sea2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The health of the Baltic Sea is negatively affected by hazardous substances such as metals and persistent organic pollutants (POPs), which include legacy pollutants that were banned decades ago, but still circulate in the ecosystem. Elevated levels of legacy pollutants, identified by HELCOM as key hazardous substances, have been found in accumulations of fibrous sediments, so-called fiberbanks and fiber-rich sediments, which derive from old pulp mills along the Swedish north coast. The fiberbanks are deposited in shallow water and bathymetrical models show evidence of their erosion, potentially caused by propeller wash, submarine landslides and gas ebullition. This thesis addresses the potential dispersal of key substances from three fiberbank sites located in a non-tidal Swedish estuary, in which metals and POPs are present in concentrations that may pose a risk for benthic organisms. Metals and POPs are partitioned to organic material and, as expected, show the highest partitioning coefficients (KD) in fiberbanks that have higher TOC levels compared to adjacent areas with fiber-rich sediments (natural clay sediments mixed up with fibers) or relatively unaffected postglacial clays. However, many analytes were found to be present in quantifiable concentrations in pore water, which indicates diffusion of substances from the solid phase to the aqueous phase. To assess the dispersive influence of an abrupt erosional event on dispersion, metals were measured in undisturbed bottom water and in bottom water disturbed by artificial re-suspension of fibrous sediments. The bioavailable, dissolved fraction of metals decreased in bottom water after re-suspension, probably due to the particle concentration effect. In contrast, the total concentrations of metals and number of quantifiable metals increased with particle concentration caused by re-suspension. At one station, the total concentration of chromium (Cr) was elevated to a level where it may lower the ecological status of the water body during periods of substantial erosion (e.g. spring floods or submarine landslides). Analyses of disturbed bottom water revealed, however, that minerogenic particles were preferentially re-suspended compared to organic. This suggests that physical erosion and re-suspension of fiberbank sediments might have a larger effect on dispersal of metals than on POPs.

    List of papers
    1. Distribution and dispersal of metals in contaminated fibrous sediments of industrial origin
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distribution and dispersal of metals in contaminated fibrous sediments of industrial origin
    (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Keywords
    Fiberbank, fiber-rich sediments, metals, bottom water, pore water, dispersal, sorption
    National Category
    Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349805 (URN)
    Projects
    TREASURE
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council Formas, 214-2014-63The Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), 362-1493/2013The Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), 411-1578/2013
    Available from: 2018-05-02 Created: 2018-05-02 Last updated: 2018-05-02
    2. Persistent organic pollutants in wood fiber contaminated sediments from the Baltic Sea
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Persistent organic pollutants in wood fiber contaminated sediments from the Baltic Sea
    Show others...
    (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Keywords
    Chlorinated pollutants, organic carbon, fibrous sediment, pore water, pulp and paper emissions.
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349824 (URN)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council Formas, 214-2014-63
    Available from: 2018-05-02 Created: 2018-05-02 Last updated: 2018-05-02
  • 21.
    Arellano, Santiago
    et al.
    Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Yalire, M.
    Observatoire Volcanologique de Goma, Centre de Recherche en Sciences Naturelles, Lwiro, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
    Galle, Bo
    Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bobrowski, M.
    Institute of Environmental Physics, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Dingwell, Adam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Johansson, M.
    Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Norman, P.
    Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Long-term monitoring of SO2 quiescent degassing from Nyiragongo’s lava lake2017In: Journal of African Earth Sciences, ISSN 0899-5362, Vol. 134, p. 866-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The activity of open-vent volcanoes with an active lava-lake, such as Nyiragongo, is characterized by persistent degassing, thus continuous monitoring of the rate, volume and fate of their gas emissions is of great importance to understand their geophysical state and their potential impact. We report results of SO2 emission measurements from Nyiragongo conducted between 2004 and 2012 with a network of ground-based scanning-DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) remote sensors. The mean SO2 emission rate is found to be 13 ± 9 kg s−1, similar to that observed in 1959. Daily emission rate has a distribution close to log-normal and presents large inter-day variability, reflecting the dynamics of percolation of magma batches of heterogeneous size distribution and changes in the effective permeability of the lava lake. The degassed S content is found to be between 1000 and 2000 ppm from these measurements and the reported magma flow rates sustaining the lava lake. The inter-annual trend and plume height statistics indicate stability of a quiescently degassing lava lake during the period of study.

  • 22.
    Arnlund, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Utredning av reningsfunktionen hos Kungsängens dagvattendamm: en studie med flödesproportionell provtagning2014Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Stormwater is the name for rainwater and snowmelt runoff from impervious surfaces in the urban environment. This water often carries large amounts of pollutants such as heavy metals, nutrients, and oil-related substances, which can cause great damage if they reach the receiving waters. To clean the storm water and thus reduce the pollution load, more and more open storm water systems are being built, such as wetlands and ponds. Studies have shown that these systems have high pollutant removal efficiency and are cost effective. Knowledge of how these systems work and how they best are evaluated is limited.

    “Kungsängsdammen” near Uppsala is a newly constructed stormwater facility that is designed to clean and retard stormwater from the industrial and commercial area Boländerna. This thesis aims to investigate the purification function of the facility. Flow proportional sampling was carried out at the inlet and outlet for 8 weeks. Substances that were analyzed were nutrients P and N, suspended solids, heavy metals As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, V, Zn and petroleum hydrocarbons. On some occasions, the petroleum-related organic parameters PAHs, octyl and nonylphenols and tributyltin were analyzed. Flow proportional sampling is recommended to determine the efficiency of a stormwater pond, but the problem is that it takes much time and considerable resources. In addition to this method, additional measurements were carried out with sediment traps, and a calculation of pollution load at the inlet with the program StormTac.

    The flow proportional sampling showed that the “Kungsängsdammen” pond-, functions well as a treatment facility for pollutions. Suspended solids, nutrients and heavy metals are separated effectively and the outlet concentrations for these substances were below proposed guideline values. This is observed, despite the fact that zinc, copper, nitrogen and suspended solids had intake concentrations above the guideline values. Flow calculations showed that the bypass flow is important when estimating the pollutant removal efficiency. For organic compounds, tributyltin was measured at concentrations above the Environmental Quality Standards (EQS) for surface water both at the inlet and outlet. The inlet concentrations that were calculated in StormTac were consistent with the results of the flow proportional sampling for heavy metals and nutrients. Moreover, the investigation of sediments showed that sedimentation occurs mainly in the ditch before the pond and at the inlet to the pond. The ditch is in need of cleansing, because of the risk of sediment being washed away during high flows.

    The flow proportional sampling showed that the “Kungsängsdammen” pond-, functions wellas a treatment facility for pollutions. Suspended solids, nutrients and heavy metals are separated effectively and the outlet concentrations for these substances were below proposedguideline values. This is observed, despite the fact that zinc, copper, nitrogen and suspended solids had intake concentrations above the guideline values. Flow calculations showed that the bypass flow is important when estimating the pollutant removal efficiency. For organiccompounds, tributyltin was measured at concentrations above the Environmental Quality Standards (EQS) for surface water both at the inlet and outlet. The inlet concentrations that were calculated in StormTac were consistent with the results of the flow proportional sampling for heavy metals and nutrients. Moreover, the investigation of sediments showedthat sedimentation occurs mainly in the ditch before the pond and at the inlet to the pond. The ditch is in need of cleansing, because of the risk of sediment being washed away during high flows.

  • 23.
    Audet, Joachim
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, POB 7050, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wallin, Marcus B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Kyllmar, Katarina
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Soil & Environm, POB 7014, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Stefan
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Soil & Environm, POB 7014, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, POB 7050, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nitrous oxide emissions from streams in a Swedish agricultural catchment2017In: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, ISSN 0167-8809, E-ISSN 1873-2305, Vol. 236, p. 295-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excess nitrogen fertiliser in agricultural soils might be leached to streams and converted to the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). To assess the importance of N2O emissions from agricultural streams, concentration dynamics and emissions N2O emissions in streams were investigated in a 32 km2 lowland agricultural catchment located in Sweden. Dissolved N2O concentration was measured at nine occasions between December 2014 and August 2015 at nine stream stations. The stream stations represented sub-catchments with different land use characteristics with agricultural land use ranging from 0 to 63% of the area. Stream N2O percentage saturation ranged 40-2701% and showed large spatial and temporal variations. Statistical analysis using mixed models revealed that N2O concentration was significantly linked to nitrate concentration in the stream water, to the percentage arable land in the sub catchments as well as to the stream water discharge. Using two empirical equations to estimate the N2O emissions showed that streams were generally a source of N2O to the atmosphere (mean 108 and 175 mu g N m(-2) h(-1) with first and second equation). The catchment scale estimate of N2O stream emissions was compared to the estimate obtained using IPCC guidelines linking N fertilisation inputs and leaching to N2O emissions. The comparison suggested that N2O stream emission calculated using the IPCC methodology might be underestimated. A coarse estimate suggests that N2O stream emissions represent about 4% of the total N2O emissions from N-fertiliser at the catchment scale. Hence while streams covered only 0.1% of the catchment area they were of disproportionate importance as a source of N2O to the atmosphere.

  • 24.
    Back, Emil
    Institutionen för energi och teknik, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Förbehandlingstekniker och LCA för rötning av organiskt avfall: Modellkonstruktion och Utvärdering med ORWARE2015Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this master thesis project was to develop computer models of some plausiblepretreatment techniques and to assess the potential benefits/costs of using pretreatment andanaerobic digestion for waste management of organic waste from a system perspective. Forthis purpose a computer program called ORWARE has been used. ORWARE (organic wasteresearch) is a program for making life cycle assessments of waste management. As the mainpart of the project work the ORWARE system has been provided with three new models ofpretreatment techniques. The additions consist of: One model of pretreatment with ultrasound,one model of thermal hydrolysis and one model of a screw press. All three technologies hadthe potential to deal with technical hindrances of treating certain waste types with anaerobicdigestion.With ORWARE, life cycle assessment was made by simulations of various wastemanagement scenarios. A total of nine scenarios were simulated for the waste management ofthree different types of wastes: Bio sludge, fibre sludge and food waste, with three scenariosfor each waste type. Bio sludge is microbial sludge from biological waste water treatment.Fibre sludge is lignocellulosic sludge mainly from the pulp and paper industries. Food wasteis generally considered to be the unwanted part of food from households, restaurants and foodindustry.Three primary waste management scenarios, one scenario for each waste type, which includedpretreatment and anaerobic digestion, were simulated. There was a “bio sludge scenario” withultrasonication pretreatment, a “fibre sludge scenario” with thermal hydrolysis pretreatment(THP) and a “food waste scenario” with screw press pretreatment. The rest of the ninescenarios were assessed as comparative references to the three primary ones. These scenariosrepresented conventional methods of waste management or variations of the primaryscenarios.The resulting life cycle assessments show that anaerobic digestion of some organicwastes produces about the same amount of greenhouse gases, acidifying pollutants andeutrophying pollutants as incineration does (where the heat from incineration is made useful).The biggest downside of the anaerobic digestion waste management process is the electricityuse needed for pretreatment and for heating the anaerobic digestion. An electricity cost that inthis case is assumed to be provided through coal power, which is a common assumption whenassessing the impact of margin power utilization in life cycle assessment. If that assumptioncould instead be that the electricity is provided by a less polluting power source, the anaerobicdigestion alternative could lessen the overall pollution since the methane is commonly used asa renewable substitute for fossil fuels.In this master thesis project the ecological and economical benefits and costs of managingorganic waste through pretreatment and anaerobic digestion were assessed. These benefits andcosts were compared to conventional waste management in Sweden. The comparison showsthat anaerobic digestion of organic waste is beneficial for reduction of global warming butlikely has a greater economical cost than the conventional methods, e.g. incineration.

  • 25.
    Backström, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, Umea, Sweden..
    Heynen, Martina
    Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Umea, Sweden..
    Brännäs, Eva
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, Umea, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Jan
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, Umea, Sweden..
    Winberg, Svante
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Magnhagen, Carin
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, Umea, Sweden..
    Anaesthesia and handling stress effects on pigmentation and monoamines in Arctic charr2017In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 471-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress responsiveness differs between individuals and is often categorized into different stress coping styles. Using these stress coping styles for selection in fish farming could be beneficial, since stress is one main factor affecting welfare. In Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) carotenoid pigmentation is associated with stress responsiveness and stress coping styles. Thus this could be an important tool to use for selection of stress resilient charr. However, anaesthetics seem to affect carotenoid pigmentation, and it would be better if the method for selection could be implemented during normal maintenance, which usually includes anaesthetics. Therefore, this study investigated how the use of anaesthetics affected carotenoid pigmentation, i.e. number of spots, over time compared to no-anaesthetic treatment. Additionally, the stress indicators monoamines and glucocorticoids were investigated. The results indicate that the anaesthetic MS-222 affects number of spots on the right side. This anaesthetic also increased dopaminergic activity in the telencephalon. Both brain dopaminergic and serotonergic activity was associated with spottiness. Further, behaviour during anaesthetization was associated with spots on the left side, but not the right side. Repetition of the same treatment seemed to affect spot numbers on the right side. In conclusion, this study shows that inducing stress in charr affects the carotenoid spots. Thus, it is possible to use anaesthetics when evaluating spottiness although careful planning is needed.

  • 26.
    Beaudoin, Anne
    et al.
    Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
    Pienitz, Reinhard
    Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
    Francus, Pierre
    INRS-ETE, Québec, Canada.
    Zdanowicz, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    St-Onge, Guillaume
    Université du Québec à Rimouski, Québec, Canada.
    Palaeoenvironmental history of the last six centuries in the Nettilling Lake area (Baffin Island, Canada): A multi-proxy analysis2016In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 26, no 11, p. 1835-1846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Baffin Island region in the eastern Canadian Arctic has recently experienced a rapid warming, possibly unprecedented in millennia. To investigate theresponse of freshwater environments to this warming and place it in a secular perspective, we analyzed a 90-cm-long sediment core from Nettilling Lake,the largest lake of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The core was taken from a part of the lake basin that receives meltwater and sediment inputs from thenearby Penny Ice Cap. The core time scale, established using 137Cs and palaeomagnetic techniques, spans an estimated 600 years. A multi-proxy approachwas used to document changes in the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the sediments. We found evidence for a relatively warm period (mid/late 15th century to mid/late 16th century) during the early part of the ‘Little Ice Age’ (LIA), characterized by high sedimentation rates and laminations.This was followed by colder, drier, and windier conditions corresponding to the coldest phase of LIA and coinciding with the latest and most extensiveperiod of regional ice cap expansion (early 16th to late 19th centuries). A rapid warming occurred at the beginning of the 20th century. Variations intitanium (Ti) content in the core, a proxy for detrital sediment inputs, showed good agreement with reconstructed secular variations in summer meltrates on Penny Ice Cap between the mid-14th century and the present-day, providing supporting evidence for a climatic–hydrological connection betweenthe ice cap and Nettilling Lake.

  • 27.
    Beijer, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Björlenius, Berndt
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Albanova Univ Ctr, Sch Biotechnol, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Shaik, Siraz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology. IUF Leibniz Res Inst Environm Med, Hennekamp 50, D-40225 Dusseldorf, Germany..
    Lindberg, Richard H.
    Umea Univ, Dept Chem, KBC 6A Linnaeus Vag 6, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Brunström, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Brandt, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Removal of pharmaceuticals and unspecified contaminants in sewage treatment effluents by activated carbon filtration and ozonation: Evaluation using biomarker responses and chemical analysis2017In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 176, p. 342-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traces of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and other chemicals are demonstrated in effluents from sewage treatment plants (STPs) and they may affect quality of surface water and eventually drinking water. Treatment of effluents with granular activated carbon (GAC) or ozone to improve removal of APIs and other contaminants was evaluated at two Swedish STPs, Kappala and Uppsala (88 and 103 APIs analyzed). Biomarker responses in rainbow trout exposed to regular and additionally treated effluents were determined. GAC and ozone treatment removed 87-95% of the total concentrations of APIs detected. In Kappala, GAC removed 20 and ozonation (7 g O-3/m(3)) 21 of 24 APIs detected in regular effluent. In Uppsala, GAC removed 25 and ozonation (5.4 g O-3/m(3)) 15 of 25 APIs detected in effluent. GAC and ozonation also reduced biomarker responses caused by unidentified pollutants in STP effluent water. Elevated ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in gills was observed in fish exposed to effluent in both STPs. Gene expression analysis carried out in Kappala showed increased concentrations of cytochrome P450 (CYP1A5 and CYP1C3) transcripts in gills and of CYP1As in liver of fish exposed to effluent. In fish exposed to GAC- or ozone-treated effluent water, gill EROD activity and expression of CYP1As and CYP1C3 in gills and liver were generally equal to or below levels in fish held in tap water. The joint application of chemical analysis and sensitive biomarkers proved useful for evaluating contaminant removal in STPs with new technologies.

  • 28.
    Bengtsson, Stefan L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, SWEDESD - The Swedish International Centre of Education for Sustainable Development.
    Aporias, politics of ontology, ethics, and “we”?2016In: The Journal of Environmental Education, ISSN 0095-8964, E-ISSN 1940-1892, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 163-168Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Berg, Per G.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    4. The city as a sustainable living system: Hågaby as a demonstration model of the conditions required for creating a sustainable living system2002In: Basic patterns of sustainability: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén and Madeleine Granvik, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, p. 24-33Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Living systems in general and urban structures in particular finda large number of ways to make themselves sustainable. In thischapter the five properties for sustainability applied to the modelneighbourhood Hågaby is described, and discussed as a generaltheory for sustainability of urban environments.

  • 30.
    Berg, Per G.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    5. Demonstrating sustainability in human habitats: Six resources and 50 aspects of sustainability in Hågaby settlement2002In: Basic patterns of sustainability: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén and Madeleine Granvik, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, p. 34-38Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Methods to demonstrate resources for sustainability in the modelarea Hågaby are described. Physical, economic, organisational,human and cultural resources are studied using a mix of quantitativeand qualitative assessments.

  • 31.
    Berg, Per G.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    6. Developing sustainability in Hågaby village2002In: Basic patterns of sustainability: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén and Madeleine Granvik, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, p. 39-56Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The results of the first four years of development (1996-2000) ofthe model project Hågaby are reported. Data include quantitativeanalysis of a series of practical projects such as solar energy,wastewater treatment, household composting, as well as socialand economic aspects of a sustainable community life.

  • 32.
    Berg, Per G
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    11. Urbanisation and Urban-Rural Cooperation2012In: Rural Development and Land Use / [ed] Lars Rydén and Ingrid Karlsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 141-154Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Bergström, Ulrika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology. ekotoxikologi.
    Olsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology. ekotoxikologi.
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R
    Komorowski, Jan
    Brandt, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology. ekotoxikologi.
    Neurotoxicity of the Olfactory toxicant 2,6-Dichlorophenyl Methylsulphone in Olfactory bulb:Impaired expression of genes relating to neurodegenerative disease2007In: DIOXIN2007, 2007, p. 1841-1844Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Bernabó, Ilaria
    et al.
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Calabria, Italy.
    Brunelli, Elivra
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Calabria, Italy.
    Berg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Bonacci, Antonella
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Calabria, Italy.
    Tripepi, Sandro
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Calabria, Italy.
    Endosulfan acute toxicity in Bufo bufo gills: ultrastructural changes and nitric oxide synthase localization2008In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 447-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endosulfan is an organochlorine pesticide used in agriculture for a wide range of crops. Endosulfan concentrations of up to 0.7 mg/L can be found in ponds and streams near sprayed agricultural fields. We investigated the short-term toxicity of endosulfan in common toad (Bufo bufo) tadpoles after 24, 48, and 96 h of exposure. Acute toxicity was evaluated at nominal concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.6 mg/L: concentrations that could be found after the application of pesticide. Our results show that 0.43 mg/L of endosulfan caused 50% mortality (LC(50)). The effects of a sublethal endosulfan concentration (0.2mg/L) on gill apparatus morphology were evaluated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Immunohistochemical methods were also applied to detect the expression pattern of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the gills using the confocal laser scanner microscope. Exposure to 0.2mg/L of endosulfan caused an apparent increase in mucus production, the occurrence of secretory vesicles and lamellar bodies, a widening of intercellular spaces and additionally there was evidence of an inflammatory response in the gill apparatus. The morphological alterations occurred after 24h and were more pronounced after 48 and 96 h of exposure. Altered morphology and increased mucus secretion indicate impaired gas exchange and osmoregulation in the gills. In addition, there was an increase of iNOS expression after 24 and 48 h which may reflect hypoxia and inflammation in the gill epithelium. Our results clearly indicate that short-term exposure to a sublethal concentration of endosulfan, near the high end of the environmental range, disrupts gill morphology and function in B. bufo tadpoles.

  • 35. Berry, Pam
    et al.
    Fabok, Veronika
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Bredin, Yennie
    Garcia-Llorente, Marina
    Kovacs, Eszter
    Gaemana, Nicoleta
    Stanciu, Adina
    Termansen, Mette
    Jääskeläinen, Tiina
    Haslett, John R.
    Harrison, Paula A.
    Why conserve biodiversity? A multi-national exploration of stakeholders views on the arguments for biodiversity conservationIn: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Björnberg, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Elenström, Anna-Klara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Pharmaceuticals in the Environment: Concentrations Found in the Water, Soil and Crops in Kampala2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In Kampala, the capital of Uganda, there is an extensive use of water mixed with wastewater for irrigation of crops. The water is taken from Nakivubo channel that flows through the centre of the city, and since the wastewater treatment in the city is insufficient, the channel water might contain pharmaceuticals that are spread to the farmlands and the crops that are grown in Nakivubo wetland. The aim of this Master’s thesis was to examine the concentration of some selected pharmaceuticals in water, soil and crop samples collected from Nakivubo channel and the area surrounding it. The water was analysed from five measurement points in the Nakivubo channel and Lake Victoria. The solid samples comprised of soil and crops collected from cocoyam, maize and sugar cane fields in the Nakivubo area. The pharmaceutical analyses were carried out through pharmaceutical extraction (solid phase extraction and QuEChERS) and the use of LC-MS (liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry). The capacities of the water and soil to reduce pharmaceuticals were analysed and a risk assessment was made in order to determine if it was harmful to drink water from Lake Victoria, the source of drinking water for Kampala, or to eat the crops that were grown in the wetland.

    A majority of the pharmaceuticals studied (42 substances) were detected in the water samples (29 substances). The most common pharmaceuticals detected in the water were atenolol, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. The antibiotics trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole showed the highest average concentrations in the various water samples (26100 ng/l and 3790 ng/l respectively). Fewer pharmaceuticals were detected in the soil compared to the water (11 substances). The pharmaceuticals most frequently found in the soil were carbamazepine and pyrimethamine and they also had the highest average concentrations along with trimethoprim, 4.6-9.4 ng/g, 8.4-14.0 ng/g and 39.6 ng/g, respectively. No pharmaceuticals could be detected in the edible part of maize and sugar cane, but lidocaine, trimethoprim and pyrimethamine were found in detectable concentrations in the yam (on average 1.2-2.2 ng/g). A significant negative correlation could be found between carbamazepine and total suspended solids (TSS) in the water (linear regression: y = -0.67x +3.98, R2 = 0.35, p < 0.05, n = 14). The risk assessment showed that the concentrations found in the yam and water in Lake Victoria together with the average daily intake of yam and drinking water was not hazardous to the people of Kampala. However, eating more than 0.5 kg of yam daily might pose a risk with regards to pyrimethamine. On the other hand, the concentration in the yam might decrease when it is boiled, and this has not been accounted for.

  • 37.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Swedish Biodiversity Centre.
    Andersson, Johan
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Bjelke, Ulf
    Hilding-Rydevik, Tuija
    Johansson, Frank
    Effects of management, function and vegetation on the biodiversity in urban ponds2016In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, E-ISSN 1610-8167, Vol. 20, p. 103-112-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hilding-Rydevik, Tuija
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    “A Thousand flowers are flowering just now” – towards integration of ecosystem services concept into decision making2018In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 30, p. 181-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the integration of the ecosystem services (ES) concept in decision making.

    We use the three dimensions of learning to investigate the use of the ES concept.

    ES concept seems to meet several positive expectations put forward in science and policy.

    A main contribution from the concept may potentially be its function as a “boundary object”.

    Implementing ES into practice is a complex process and a multifaceted task.

  • 39.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Recreational fishing for sea trout – for whom and to what value?2018In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 204, p. 380-389Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    What factors enable or hinder engagement of civil society in ecosystem management? The case of “pike factories” and wetland restoration in Sweden.In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    What factors enable or hinder engagement of civil society in ecosystem management?: The case of "pike factories' and wetland restoration in Sweden2018In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 61, no 5-6, p. 950-969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engaging civil society in conservation activities is an important complementary strategy to counteract ongoing biodiversity decline and loss of ecosystem services. Since 2011, the Swedish Anglers Association (SAA) has cooperated with landowners to restore wetlands nationwide. We investigated factors that enabled or hindered civil society-led wetland restoration in Sweden through interviews and surveys with the SAA's project leaders and landowners. Principal internal and external factors contributing to the project's implementation included: flexibility and adaptive management of its leadership; support from authorities and policies; the good reputation of the SAA team; and landowners' willingness to cooperate. The latter was linked to their feelings of environmental responsibility, the low investment required by them, and expectations of some benefits. We discuss the need to enable adaptive management in environmental management projects, adjust existing policies to their needs, and re-think funding strategies to consider the long-term nature of such projects.

  • 42.
    Blixt, Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Kemisk karaktärisering samt nedbrytning av process- och avloppsvatten vid SCA Ortvikens pappersbruk2006Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During pulp and papermaking process a huge amount of water is used. The wastewater contains a large amount of pollutants and has to be treated before it reaches the recipient. In March 2004 a new bleaching plant was started up at SCA Graphic Sundsvall AB, Ortviken’s paper mill using peroxide. The production of bleached thermo mechanical pulp and thus the load to the wastewater plant increased. During bleaching substances dissolve from the pulp and the amount of COD in the wastewater increase. To keep the efficiency of chemical and biological oxygen demand (COD, BOD) removal, the aerated lagoon is supplied by liquid oxygen. In November the same year a new pre-step including a pre-aeration, carrier and selector step was added to the existing wastewater plant. The COD-loading to the lagoon decreased and the supply of liquid oxygen was reduced.

    This master thesis has been carried out at SCA Graphic Research AB, Sundsvall. The aim was to chemically characterize the wastewater with focus on the composition of carbohydrates, lignin and extractives and its influence on the biodegradability. Measurements have been carried out on total samples, suspended solids, colloidal and dissolved substances using GF/A and ultra filtration. Measurements were performed on process water from the bleaching plant and on water during the wastewater treatment process. The results show that the chemical composition of dissolved substances has a larger impact on the biodegradability than the total amount of COD. A large amount of lignin will make the wastewater harder to degrade. Suspended solids have lower biodegradability compared to the dissolved fraction. Analyzes of suspended material from the bleaching plant show a relative composition of around 41 % lignin. Analyzes done before on the dissolved fraction show a composition of 29 %. It seems that a larger amount of lignin is represented in suspended solids compared to the dissolved fraction. This can explain the low biodegradability, combined with the theory that the suspended solids are less accessible for the microorganisms. To reduce the outgoing COD the incoming flow of dissolved lignin and suspended solids to the active sludge plant has to decrease. COD in the outgoing wastewater to the recipient consists of around 90 % lignin. Extractives as saturated fatty acids, palmitic and stearic acid plus lignans (which is interpreted as a byproduct from lignin degradation) do not degrade remarkable during wastewater treatment. Flocculation of COD is one way to reduce the discharge to the recipient. Addition of 2,6 g/l PAX-18 (a high charged aluminum complex) to the wastewater from the bleaching plant gives a reduction of 40 % COD and 50 % lignin in laboratory scale and it is recommended to study further. Time related studies of BOD show that the microorganisms need five days to degrade organic material and the hydraulic retention time in the aerated lagoon has to be guaranteed.

  • 43.
    Blum, Kristin M.
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Chem, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Norström, Sara H.
    Umea Univ, Dept Chem, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Golovko, Oksana
    Univ South Bohemia Ceske Budejovice, Fac Fisheries & Protect Waters, South Bohemian Res Ctr Aquaculture & Biodivers Hy, Zatisi 728-2, Vodnany 38925, Czech Republic..
    Grabic, Roman
    Univ South Bohemia Ceske Budejovice, Fac Fisheries & Protect Waters, South Bohemian Res Ctr Aquaculture & Biodivers Hy, Zatisi 728-2, Vodnany 38925, Czech Republic..
    Järhult, Josef D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Koba, Olga
    Univ South Bohemia Ceske Budejovice, Fac Fisheries & Protect Waters, South Bohemian Res Ctr Aquaculture & Biodivers Hy, Zatisi 728-2, Vodnany 38925, Czech Republic..
    Söderström Lindström, Hanna
    Umea Univ, Dept Chem, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Occupat & Environm Med, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Removal of 30 active pharmaceutical ingredients in surface water under long-term artificial UV irradiation2017In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 176, p. 175-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the i) kinetics, and ii) proportion of photolysis of 30 relatively stable active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) during artificial UV irradiation for 28 d in ammonium acetate buffer, filtered and unfiltered river water. Buffer was included to control removal kinetics under stable pH conditions and without particulate matter. Dark controls were used to determine removal due to other processes than photolysis and calculate the proportion of photolysis of the total removal. The removal of each API in each matrix was determined using online solid phase extraction/liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (online SPE/LC-MS/MS). Most APIs transformed during the 28 d of UV irradiation and the dark controls showed that photolysis was the major removal process for the majority of the APIs studied. The half-lives ranged from 6 h (amitriptyline) in unfiltered river water to 884 h (37 d, carbamazepine) in buffer. In unfiltered river water, the proportion of APIs with short half-lives (<48 h) was much higher (29%) than in the other matrices (4%), probably due to additional organic carbon, which could have promoted indirect photolysis. Furthermore, two APIs, memantine and fluconazole, were stable in all three matrices, while alprazolam was stable in buffer and unfiltered river water and four additional APIs were stable in buffer. Considering the relatively long-term UV-exposure, this study enabled the investigation of environmentally relevant half-lives in natural waters. Many APIs showed high persistence, which is environmentally concerning and emphasizes the importance of further studies on their environmental fate and effects.

  • 44.
    Bravo, Andrea G.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Loizeau, Jean-Luc
    Univ Geneva, Inst FA Forel, Earth & Environm Sci, 10 Route Suisse, CH-1290 Versoix, Switzerland..
    Dranguet, Perrine
    Univ Geneva, Inst FA Forel, Earth & Environm Sci, 10 Route Suisse, CH-1290 Versoix, Switzerland..
    Makri, Stamatina
    Univ Geneva, Inst FA Forel, Earth & Environm Sci, 10 Route Suisse, CH-1290 Versoix, Switzerland..
    Bjorn, Erik
    Umea Univ, Dept Chem, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Ungureanu, Viorel Gh.
    Univ Bucharest, Fac Geol & Geophys, Bucharest, Romania.;GeoEcoMar, Natl Res & Dev Inst Marine Geol & Geoecol, Bucharest, Romania..
    Slaveykova, Vera I.
    Univ Geneva, Inst FA Forel, Earth & Environm Sci, 10 Route Suisse, CH-1290 Versoix, Switzerland..
    Cosio, Claudia
    Univ Geneva, Inst FA Forel, Earth & Environm Sci, 10 Route Suisse, CH-1290 Versoix, Switzerland..
    Persistent Hg contamination and occurrence of Hg-methylating transcript (hgcA) downstream of a chlor-alkali plant in the Olt River (Romania)2016In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 23, no 11, p. 10529-10541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlor-alkali plants using mercury (Hg) cell technology are acute point sources of Hg pollution in the aquatic environment. While there have been recent efforts to reduce the use of Hg cells, some of the emitted Hg can be transformed to neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg). Here, we aimed (i) to study the dispersion of Hg in four reservoirs located downstream of a chlor-alkali plant along the Olt River (Romania) and (ii) to track the activity of bacterial functional genes involved in Hg methylation. Total Hg (THg) concentrations in water and sediments decreased successively from the initial reservoir to downstream reservoirs. Suspended fine size particles and seston appeared to be responsible for the transport of THg into downstream reservoirs, while macrophytes reflected the local bioavailability of Hg. The concentration and proportion of MeHg were correlated with THg, but were not correlated with bacterial activity in sediments, while the abundance of hgcA transcript correlated with organic matter and Cl- concentration, indicating the importance of Hg bioavailability in sediments for Hg methylation. Our data clearly highlights the importance of considering Hg contamination as a legacy pollutant since there is a high risk of continued Hg accumulation in food webs long after Hg-cell phase out.

  • 45.
    Breed, Martin F.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Stead, Michael G.
    Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity (ACEBB) and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide.
    Ottewell, Kym M.
    Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity (ACEBB) and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide.
    Gardner, Michael G.
    Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity (ACEBB) and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide.
    Lowe, Andrew J.
    Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity (ACEBB) and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide.
    Which provenance and where?: Seed sourcing strategies for revegetation in a changing environment2013In: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-10Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Revegetation is one practical application of science that should ideally aim to combine ecology with evolution to maximise biodiversity and ecosystem outcomes. The strict use of locally sourced seed in revegetation programs is widespread and is based on the expectation that populations are locally adapted. This practice does not fully integrate two global drivers of ecosystem change and biodiversity loss: habitat fragmentation and climate change. Here, we suggest amendments to existing strategies combined with a review of alternative seed-sourcing strategies that propose to mitigate against these drivers. We present a provenancing selection guide based on confidence surrounding climate change distribution modelling and data on population genetic and/or environmental differences between populations. Revegetation practices will benefit from greater integration of current scientific developments and establishment of more long-term experiments is key to improving the long-term success. The rapid growth in carbon and biodiversity markets creates a favourable economic climate to achieve these outcomes.

  • 46.
    Brodd, Patrick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Long term heavy metal contamination from leakage water sediments2004Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 47.
    Broman, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
    Observation of methanogenesis and potential iron-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane in old lake sediments, a study of two boreal forest lakes.2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Organic and inorganic carbon can enter inland waters in different ways, and often a considerable amount of this carbon is coming from terrestrial input. Once this terrestrial carbon enters a lake, the carbon may be degraded, mineralized or eventually buried in the sediment. Below the oxic zone of the sediment carbon may be used by archaea to produce methane (CH4). The CH4 can then diffuse up in the sediment and escape to the bottom waters, or the CH4 can be oxidized by bacteria using oxygen as an oxidant. There is also an anoxic process to oxidize CH4 (anaerobic oxidation of methane: AOM), using sulfate (SO4) and by recent findings also ferric iron (Fe(III)) as electron acceptors. In this study the main questions of interest were if CH4 is produced in deep (i.e. old) lake sediments and if CH4 is oxidized anaerobically using Fe(III). Two Swedish boreal forest lakes were studied, sediment profiles of CH4 were conducted in the field (down to 60 cm). Collected sediments were sliced anoxically at different depths and then analyzed for ferrous iron (Fe(II)), Fe(III) and SO4. Sediment from different depths was also incubated anoxic in order to test if CH4 production depends on sediment age. The results show that methanogenic activity occurs by degrading old carbon in deep boreal forest lake sediments, and that a certain part of this might then be oxidized anaerobically. However, all cores exposed a general trend of increasing CH4 concentrations with sediment depth, indicating that CH4 production in old sediment layers is greater than AOM. AOM could therefore only act as a partial sink for CH4 in anoxic deep sediments.

  • 48.
    Buhaug, H.
    et al.
    Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), Oslo; Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim.
    Nordkvelle, J.
    Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), Oslo.
    Bernauer, T.
    Center for Comparative and International Studies, ETH Zurich, Zurich.
    Böhmelt, T.
    Center for Comparative and International Studies, ETH Zurich, Zurich; Department of Government, University of Essex.
    Brzoska, M.
    University of Hamburg.
    Busby, J. W.
    Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas, Austin.
    Ciccone, A.
    University of Mannheim.
    Fjelde, Hanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Gartzke, E.
    Department of Government, University of Essex.
    Gleditsch, N. P.
    Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), Oslo; Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim.
    Goldstone, J. A.
    Hegre, Håvard
    Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), Oslo.
    Holtermann, H.
    Koubi, V.
    Center for Comparative and International Studies, ETH Zurich, Zurich.
    Link, J. S. A.
    University of Hamburg.
    Link, P. M.
    University of Hamburg.
    Lujala, P.
    O'Loughlin, J.
    Raleigh, C.
    Scheffran, J.
    University of Hamburg.
    Schilling, J.
    University of Hamburg.
    Smith, T. G.
    Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas, Austin.
    Theisen, O. M.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim.
    Tol, R. S. J.
    Urdal, H.
    Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), Oslo.
    von Uexküll, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    One effect to rule them all?: A comment on climate and conflict2014In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 127, no 3-4, p. 391-397Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent Climatic Change review article reports a remarkable convergence of scientific evidence for a link between climatic events and violent intergroup conflict, thus departing markedly from other contemporary assessments of the empirical literature. This commentary revisits the review in order to understand the discrepancy. We believe the origins of the disagreement can be traced back to the review article's underlying quantitative meta-analysis, which suffers from shortcomings with respect to sample selection and analytical coherence. A modified assessment that addresses some of these problems suggests that scientific research on climate and conflict to date has produced mixed and inconclusive results.

  • 49.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Developmental exposure to the polybrominated diphenyl ether PBDE 209: Neurobehavioural and neuroprotein analysis in adult male and female mice2014In: Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology, ISSN 1382-6689, E-ISSN 1872-7077, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 570-585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), used as flame retardants in polymer products, are reported to cause developmental neurotoxic effects in mammals. The present study have investigated neurotoxic effects arising from neonatal exposure to PBDE 209, including alterations in sex differences, spontaneous behaviour, learning and memory, neuroproteins and altered susceptibility of the cholinergic system in adults. Three-day-old NMRI mice, of both sexes, were exposed to PBDE 209 (2,2',3,3',4,4',5,5',6,6'-decaBDE at 0, 1.4, 6.0 and 14.0 mu mol/kg b.w.). At adult age (2-7 months) a similar developmental neurotoxic effects in both male and female mice were seen, including lack of or reduced habituation to a novel home environment, learning and memory defects, modified response to the cholinergic agent's paraoxon (males) and nicotine (females) indicating increased susceptibility of the cholinergic system. The behavioural defects were dose-response related and persistent. In mice of both sexes and showing behavioural defects, neuroprotein tau was increased. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 50.
    Campeau, Audrey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Department of Air Water and Landscape.
    Dataset for manuscript : Stable carbon isotopes reveal soil-stream DIC linkages in contrasting headwater catchments2018Data set
1234567 1 - 50 of 376
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf