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  • 1.
    Ahlgren, Kerstin. M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Fall, Tove
    Landegren, Nils
    von Euler, Henrik
    Sundberg, Katarina
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Lobell, Anna
    Hedhammar, Åke
    Andersson, Göran
    Hansson-Hamlin, Helene
    Lernmark, Åke
    Kämpe, Olle
    Diabetes mellitus in dog -: No evidence for a type-1-like phenotypeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in dogs, and is commonly proposed to be of autoimmune origin. Although the clinical symptoms of human type 1 diabetes (T1D) and canine DM are similar, the aetiologies may differ. The aim of this study was to investigate if autoimmune aetiology resembling human T1D is as prevalent in dogs as previously reported.

    Methods

     Sera from 121 diabetic dogs representing 38 different breeds were tested for islet cell antibodies (ICA) and GAD65 autoantibodies (GADA) and compared with sera from 133 healthy dogs from 40 breeds. ICA was detected by indirect immunofluorescence using both canine and human frozen sections. GADA was detected by in vitro transcription and translation (ITT) of human and canine GAD65, followed by immunoprecipitation.

    Results

    None of the canine sera analyzed tested positive for ICA on sections of frozen canine or human ICA pancreas. However, serum from one diabetic dog was weakly positive in the canine GADA assay and serum from one healthy dog was weakly positive in the human GADA assay.

    Conclusions/interpretations

    Based on sera from 121 diabetic dogs from 38 different breeds were tested for humoral autoreactivity using four different assays, contrary to previous observations, we find no support for an autoimmune aetiology  in canine diabetes.

  • 2.
    Ahlström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
    Testing the specificity of the pBAD arabinose reporter2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The project highlights Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Tm)'s ability to metabolize simple sugars released from dead commensal bacteria, by using the pBAD (araBAD promoter) system as a reporter of L-arabinose availability. Using bioinformatics and homology of conserved L-arabinose transporter genes shared in Escherichia coli K12 (E. coli) and S. Tm, we aimed to create a S. Tm mutant strain unable to obtain L-arabinose from it environment. During the projects course of time it was discovered that L-arabinose transporters are not a shared gene trait between E. coli and S. Tm, and that putative L-arabinose transporter orthologues may exists in the S. Tm genome.

  • 3.
    Akula, Srinivas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
    Analysis of the isotype specificity of three platypus immunoglobulin Fc receptors2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The host’s defense against diseases called immunity acts either via innate or adaptive defense mechanisms. Immunoglobulins (Ig’s) are important players in adaptive immunity. They have evolved both structurally and functionally during vertebrate evolution. The Fc region of Igs can interact with specific receptors on the surface of various immune cells; crosslinking of these Fc receptors can trigger a wide array of immune reactions. To trigger such reactions, higher mammals have five different classes of Igs (IgM, IgG, IgA, IgE and IgD) while amphibians, reptiles and birds have four (IgM, IgD, IgA and IgY).  Our recent studies have revealed that the early mammals (Platypus) have eight Ig isotypes (IgM, IgD IgO, IgG1, IgG2, IgA1, IgA2 and IgE) and at least four Fc receptors: FcRA, FcRB, FcRC and FcRD. In this study we investigated the specificity of three of these platypus Fc receptors to get a better picture of their isotype specificity.   

  • 4.
    Allkja, Jontana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    The influence of copper on mast cell during bacterial infections2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Mast cells are innate immune cells generally known for their harmful effects, particularly their role in asthma and autoimmune diseases. However, they can also recognize pathogens and mount a response to them. Copper is essential for proper cell function and homeostasis. Research has shown that changes in copper levels can affect mast cell morphology and gene expression of many of its immune mediators. It has also been shown that the copper transporter Ctr2 plays an important role in mast cell physiology. In this project, we investigated whether the same effects can be seen when mast cells are stimulated with bacteria, namely Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). For this purpose, wild type and Ctr2 knockout mast cells were treated with different concentrations of copper for 72 hours and later co-cultured with either S. aureus or E. coli. Wild type cells were also treated with a copper chelator to investigate the effect of copper starvation. Release of IL-6 and CCL2, two common mediators released in response to bacteria, were measured by ELISA, while their gene expression was measured by qPCR. Results showed that either copper starvation or, 10 μM copper cause an increase in IL-6 and CCL2 protein levels, but have no effect on gene expression. The 10 μM copper effect was not observed in the Ctr2 knockout cells. In conclusion, not much is known about the mechanisms involved in the mast cell response to bacteria. However, it appears that copper can affect either different stages of the same pathway, or different pathways in a similar manner.

  • 5.
    Almgren, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Characterization of antibodies against mustard and development of immunological methods for the detection and quantification of mustard in foods2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    Allergy to mustard has been reported for many years, in some cases as severe anaphylactic reactions. Recent studies imply that this allergy is increasing. Three major allergens have been isolated and characterised; Sin a 1 and Sin a 2 in yellow mustard (Sinapis alba), and Bra j 1 in oriental mustard (Brassica juncea). Yellow mustard and black mustard (Brassica nigra) are the most common species in Europe, whereas oriental mustard is more frequent outside Europe. Mustard plants belong to the Brassicaceae/Cruciferae family. Mustard is present as an ingredient in different foods, sauces and spices, often in small amounts. According to the European labelling directives, mustard and products thereof must always be declared. To monitor this regulation, methods need to be developed to detect mustard. Polyclonal antibodies, produced in rabbits, against yellow and black mustard were characterised with immunodiffusion, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) under reducing conditions, and immunoblotting. Rocket-immunoelectrophoresis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were developed for the detection and quantification of mustard protein. With indirect competitive ELISA a concentration of 156ng mustard protein per ml food extract was detected, which is more than enough to cover the lowest reported reactive doses.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Måns Sverker
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology. zooekologi.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Glycosylated haemoglobin: a new measure of condition in birds1995In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, no 260, p. 299-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: The influence of condition on time of breeding and reproductive success has been discussed since Darwin first suggested a relation in 1871. We used a novel method to investigate the influence of condition on the timing of breeding and reproductive success by measuring a relatively inert physiological parameter - the amount of glycosylated haemoglobin - in blood samples taken from the collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis. The percentage of glycosylated haemoglobin (%HbG) was assumed to be proportional to the average blood glucose level, during the 3-5 weeks before the blood sampling. The %HbG was influenced neither by sex nor age. Date of arrival at the breeding ground was negatively correlated with %HbG so that early-arriving birds had significantly higher %HbG than those arriving later. Clutch size, corrected for the effect of laying date, correlated positively with %HbG in females, as did the number of fledged young, corrected for the effect of laying date, for both sexes. We found no correlation between body mass and the %HbG. We suggest that prebreeding condition influences the timing of breeding and subsequent reproductive performance and that %HbG can be used as an indicator of prebreeding-condition in migrating birds.

  • 7.
    Angthong, Pacharaporn
    et al.
    Chulalongkorn Univ, Program Biotechnol, Fac Sci..
    Roytrakul, Sittiruk
    Natl Sci & Technol Dev Agcy, Natl Ctr Genet Engn & Biotechnol BIOTEC..
    Jarayabhand, Padermsak
    Chulalongkorn Univ, Grad Sch, Interdisciplinary Grad Program Maritime Adm..
    Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Characterization and function of a tachylectin 5-like immune molecule in Penaeus monodon2017In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 76, p. 120-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tachylectin5A and its homolog, tachylectin5B both contain a fibrinogen-related domain (FReD) and have been studied in horseshoe crabs, Tachypleus tridentatus and Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda and shown to be involved in host defense. Here, we demonstrate the presence of tachylectin5-like genes in shrimp, Penaeus monodon, designated as Penlectin5-1 (PL5-1) and Penlectin5-2 (PL5-2), which both contain a signal peptide and a single FReD with an acetyl group and a calcium binding sites and they are both structurally similar to horseshoe crab tachylectin/carcinolectin5. The PL5-land PL5-2 transcript were expressed in various shrimp tissues in normal shrimp, and their expression was upregulated in tissues such as hemocytes and hindgut following challenge with pathogenic Vibrio harveyi. The PL5-2 protein was detected in various tissues as well as in cell-free hemolymph. The biological function of the PL5-2 protein is to recognize some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria regardless whether they are non-pathogenic or pathogenic. They have hemagglutination activity on human erythrocyte and bacterial agglutination activity to both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria. Possible binding sites of PL5-2 to bacteria could be at the N-acetyl moiety of the G1cNAc-MurNAc cell wall of the peptidoglycan since the binding could be inhibited by G1cNAc or GaINAC. The presence of PL5-2 protein in both circulating hemolymph and intestine, where host and microbes are usually interacting, may suggest that the physiological function of shrimp tachylectin-like proteins is to recognize and bind to invading bacteria to immobilize and entrap these microbes and subsequently clear them from circulation and the host body, and probably to control and maintain the normal flora in the intestine.

  • 8.
    Angthong, Pacharaporn
    et al.
    Program in Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University..
    Roytrakul, Sittiruk
    National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC); National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA)..
    Jarayabhand, Padermsak
    Interdisciplinary Graduate Program on Maritime Administration, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University..
    Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Involvement of a tachylectin-like gene and its protein in pathogenesis of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in the shrimp, Penaeus monodon2017In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 76, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A shrimp disease, the so-called acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is caused by a specific strain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VP) and it has resulted in significant losses to the global shrimp farming industry. In our previous study, three of tachylectin-like genes were cloned and characterized from the intestine of Penaeus monodon, designated as Penlectin5-1 (PL5-1), Penlectin5-2 (PL5-2) and Penlectin5-3 (PL5-3). These three genes all contain fibrinogen-related domain (FReD). The expression level of PL5-1, PL5-2 and PL5-3 was elevated in the stomach after oral administration with AHPND-causing V. parahaemolyticus 3HP (VP3HP). A polyclonal antibody to PL5-2 was successfully produced in a rabbit using the purified recombinant P15-2 as an immunogen, and this because only the predominant protein PL5-2 could be successfully purified from shrimp plasma by affinity chromatography using a N-Acetyl-oglucosamine column allowed us to perform functional studies of this lectin. The native purified PL5-2 protein had binding and agglutination activities towards VP3HR To further understand the functions and the involvements of this lectin in response to AHPND in shrimp, RNAi-mediated knockdown of PL5-1, PL5-2 or PL5-3 was performed prior to an oral administration of VP3HP. As a result, Penlectin5-silencing in shrimp challenged with VP3HP showed higher mortality and resulted in more severe histopathological changes in the hepatopancreas with typical signs of AHPND. These results therefore suggest a role for crustacean fibrinogen-related proteins (FRePs) in innate immune response during the development of AHPND, and maybe also during other infections.

  • 9.
    Apitanyasai, Kantamas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology. Chulalongkorn Univ, Dept Biochem, Ctr Excellence Mol Biol & Genom Shrimp, Fac Sci, 254 Phayathai Rd, Bangkok 10330, Thailand..
    Noonin, Chadanat
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Tassanakajon, Anchalee
    Chulalongkorn Univ, Dept Biochem, Ctr Excellence Mol Biol & Genom Shrimp, Fac Sci, 254 Phayathai Rd, Bangkok 10330, Thailand..
    Söderhäll, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Söderhäll, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Characterization of a hemocyte homeostasis-associated-like protein (HHAP) in the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus2016In: Fish and Shellfish Immunology, ISSN 1050-4648, E-ISSN 1095-9947, Vol. 58, p. 429-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hemocyte homeostasis-associated-like protein (HHAP) in the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus has a distinct role from that of its homolog PmHHAP in the shrimp Penaeus monodon. Knockdown of PIHHAP in vitro using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) had no effect on the cell morphology of hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells. The total hemocyte number and caspase activity were unchanged after PIHHAP knockdown in vivo, in contrast to the results found in shrimp. Moreover, suppression of PIHHAP both in vitro and in vivo did not change the mRNA levels of some genes involved in hematopoiesis and hemocyte homeostasis. Interestingly, bacterial count and scanning electron microscope revealed that depletion of PIHHAP in intestine by RNAi resulted in higher number of bacteria in the crayfish intestine. Together, these results suggest that PIHHAP is not involved in hemocyte homeostasis in the crayfish P. leniusculus but appears to affect the bacterial number in the intestine through an unknown mechanism. Since PIHHAP has different functions from PmHHAP, we therefore named it HHAP-like protein.

  • 10. Bambou, Jean-Christophe
    et al.
    Giraud, Antoine
    Menard, Sandrine
    Begue, Bernadette
    Rakotobe, Sabine
    Heyman, Martine
    Taddei, François
    Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine
    Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valérie
    In vitro and ex vivo activation of the TLR5 signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells by a commensal Escherichia coli strain.2004In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 279, no 41, p. 42984-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capacity of non-pathogenic enteric bacteria to induce a pro-inflammatory response is under debate in terms of its effect on the symbiosis between the mammalian host and its commensal gut microflora. Activation of NF-kappaB and induction of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and CCL-20 by the commensal Escherichia coli strain MG1655 were first studied in vitro in the human intestinal epithelial cell (IECs) lines HT29-19A and Caco-2, transfected or not with plasmids encoding dominant negative Toll-like receptor (TLR) 5 and myeloid differentiation factor-88 (MyD88) adaptor protein. The response of enterocytes in situ was then assessed using murine ileal biopsies mounted in Ussing chambers. Commensal E. coli induced NF-kappaB DNA binding, NF-kappaB transcriptional activity, CCL-20 expression, and IL-8 secretion in the human IEC lines. E. coli MG1655 flagellin was necessary and sufficient to trigger this pro-inflammatory pathway via its interaction with TLR5 and the subsequent recruitment of the adaptor protein MyD88. Following epithelial cell polarization, signaling could be induced by live E. coli and flagellin on the apical side of HT29-19A. The in vivo relevance of our findings was confirmed, because immunohistochemical staining of murine ileum demonstrated expression of TLR5 in the apical part of enterocytes in situ. Furthermore, flagellin added on the mucosal side of murine ileal biopsies mounted in Ussing chambers induced a basolateral production of KC, a functional murine homolog of human IL-8. These findings provide strong evidence that flagellin released by flagellated commensal bacteria in the intestinal lumen can induce a pro-inflammatory response in enterocytes in vivo.

  • 11.
    Barrenäs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Green, Richard R.
    Thomas, Matthew J.
    Law, G. Lynn
    Proll, Sean C.
    Engelmann, Flora
    Messaoudi, Ilhem
    Marzi, Andrea
    Feldmann, Heinz
    Katze, Michael G.
    Next-Generation Sequencing Reveals a Controlled Immune Response to Zaire Ebola Virus Challenge in Cynomolgus Macaques Immunized with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Expressing Zaire Ebola Virus Glycoprotein (VSV Delta G/EBOVgp)2015In: Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, ISSN 1556-6811, E-ISSN 1556-679X, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 354-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vesicular stomatitis virus expressing Zaire Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein (VSV Delta G/EBOVgp) could be used as a vaccine to meet the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak. To characterize the host response to this vaccine, we used mRNA sequencing to analyze peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from cynomolgus macaques after VSV Delta G/EBOVgp immunization and subsequent EBOV challenge. We found a controlled transcriptional response that transitioned to immune regulation as the EBOV was cleared. This observation supports the safety of the vaccine.

  • 12. Belov, Katherine
    et al.
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Immunology. Molekylär immunologi.
    Immunoglobulin genetics of Ornithorhynchus anatinus (platypus) and Tachyglossus aculeatus (short-beaked echidna).2003In: Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol, ISSN 1095-6433, Vol. 136, no 4, p. 811-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Belov, Katherine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Immunology. MOLECULAR IMMUNOLOGY, LARS HELLMAN.
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Immunology.
    Platypus IgM and the divergence of the two extant monotreme lineages.2003In: Australian Mammology, Vol. 25, p. 87-94Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Belov, Katherine
    et al.
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Immunology. Molekylär immunologi.
    Cooper, D.W.
    Characterization of IgG from a monotreme, Tachyglossus aculeatus2002In: Immunogenetics, Vol. 53, p. 1065-1071Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Belov, Katherine
    et al.
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Immunology. Molekylär immunologi.
    Cooper, D.W.
    Characterization of of echidna IgM provides insight into the time of divergence of extant mammals.2002In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, Vol. 26, p. 831-839Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Belov, Katherine
    et al.
    Lam, Mary K P
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Immunology. Molekylär immunologi.
    Colgan, Donald J
    Evolution of the major histocompatibility complex: Isolation of class II beta cDNAs from two monotremes, the platypus and the short-beaked echidna.2003In: Immunogenetics, ISSN 0093-7711, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 402-11Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 17. Belov, Katherine
    et al.
    Lam, MKP
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Immunology. Molekylär Immunologi.
    Colgan, DJ.
    Evolution of the major histocompatibility complex: Isolation of class II _ cDNAs from two monotremes, the platypus and the short-beaked echidna.2003In: Immunogenetics, Vol. 55, p. 402-411Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Belov, Katherine
    et al.
    Zenger, K.R.
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Immunology. Molekylär immunologi.
    Cooper, D.W.
    Echidna IgA supports mammalian unity and traditional Therian relationship2002In: Mammalian Genome, Vol. 13, p. 656-663Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Benton, Jeanne
    et al.
    Kery, Rachel
    Li, Jingjing
    Noonin, Chadanat
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Söderhäll, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Beltz, Barbara
    Cells from the Immune System Generate Adult-Born Neurons in Crayfish2014In: Developmental Cell, ISSN 1534-5807, E-ISSN 1878-1551, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 322-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurogenesis is an ongoing process in the brains of adult decapod crustaceans. However, the first-generation precursors that produce adult-born neurons, which reside in a neurogenic niche, are not self-renewing in crayfish and must be replenished. The source of these neuronal precursors is unknown. Here, we report that adult-born neurons in crayfish can be derived from hemocytes. Following adoptive transfer of 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU)-labeled hemocytes, labeled cells populate the neurogenic niche containing the first-generation neuronal precursors. Seven weeks after adoptive transfer, EdU-labeled cells are located in brain clusters 9 and 10 (where adult-born neurons differentiate) and express appropriate neurotransmitters. Moreover, the number of cells composing the neurogenic niche in crayfish is tightly correlated with total hemocyte counts (THCs) and can be manipulated by raising or lowering THC. These studies identify hemocytes as a source of adult-born neurons in crayfish and demonstrate that the immune system is a key contributor to adult neurogenesis.

  • 20.
    Berggren, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hagberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Alexsson, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Weber, Gert
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Inst Biochem, Dept Mol Struct Biol, Greifswald, Germany..
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells and RNA-containing immune complexes drive expansion of peripheral B cell subsets with an SLE-like phenotype2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 8, article id e0183946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Hyperactive B cells and a continuous interferon (IFN)-alpha production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a key role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We asked whether the interaction between B cells and pDCs stimulated with RNA-containing immune complexes affects peripheral B cell subsets. Methods B cells and pDCs were isolated from blood of healthy individuals and stimulated with immune complexes consisting of SLE-IgG and U1snRNP (RNA-IC). Expression of cell surface molecules as well as IL-6 and IL-10 production were determined by flow cytometry and immunoassays. Gene expression profiles were determined by a NanoString nCounter expression array. Results We found a remarkable increase of double negative CD27-IgD-B cells, from 7% within fresh CD19+B cells to 37% in the RNA-IC-stimulated co-cultures of B cells and pDCs, comparable to the frequency of double negative B cells in SLE patients. Gene expression analysis of the double negative CD27-IgD -and the CD27 + IgD-memory B cells revealed that twenty-one genes were differentially expressed between the two B cell subsets (>= 2-fold, p< 0.001). The, IL21R, IL4R, CCL4, CCL3, CD83 and the IKAROS Family Zinc Finger 2 (IKZ2) showed higher expression in the double negative CD27-IgD-B cells. Conclusion The interactions between B cells and pDCs together with RNA-containing IC led to an expansion of B cells with similar phenotype as seen in SLE, suggesting that the pDC-B cell crosstalk contributes to the autoimmune feed-forward loop in SLE.

  • 21.
    Bergström, Joakim J. E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Heyman, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology.
    Mice Immunized With IgG Anti-Sheep Red Blood Cells (SRBC) Together With SRBC Have a Suppressed Anti-SRBC Antibody Response but Generate Germinal Centers and Anti-IgG Antibodies in Response to the Passively Administered IgG2017In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, article id 911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antigen-specific IgG antibodies, passively administered together with large particulate antigens such as erythrocytes, can completely suppress the antigen-specific antibody response. The mechanism behind has been elusive. Herein, we made the surprising observation that mice immunized with IgG anti-sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and SRBC, in spite of a severely suppressed anti-SRBC response, have a strong germinal center (GC) response. This occurred regardless of whether the passively administered IgG was of the same allotype as that of the recipient or not. Six days after immunization, the GC size and the number of GC B cells were higher in mice immunized with SRBC alone than in mice immunized with IgG and SRBC, but at the other time points these parameters were similar. GCs in the IgG-groups had a slight shift toward dark zone B cells 6 days after immunization and toward light zone B cells 10 days after immunization. The proportions of T follicular helper cells (TFH) and T follicular regulatory cells (TFR) were similar in the two groups. Interestingly, mice immunized with allogeneic IgG anti-SRBC together with SRBC mounted a vigorous antibody response against the passively administered suppressive IgG. Thus, although their anti-SRBC response was almost completely suppressed, an antibody response against allogeneic, and probably also syngeneic, IgG developed. This most likely explains the development of GCs in the absence of an anti-SRBC antibody response.

  • 22.
    Bhandage, Amol K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Glutamate and GABA signalling components in the human brain and in immune cells2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are the principal excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS). They both can activate their ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate activates ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGlu - AMPA, kainate and NMDA receptors) and GABA activates GABA-A receptors which are modulated by many types of drugs and substances including alcohol. Using real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, I have shown that iGlu and/or GABA-A receptor subunits were expressed in the hippocampus dentate gyrus (HDG), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DL-PFC), central amygdala (CeA), caudate and putamen of the human brain and their expression was altered by chronic excessive alcohol consumption. It indicates that excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission may have been altered in the brain of human alcoholics. It is possible that changes in one type of neurotransmitter system may drive changes in another. These brain regions also play a role in brain reward system. Any changes in them may lead to changes in the normal brain functions.

    Apart from the CNS, glutamate and GABA are also present in the blood and can be synthesised by pancreatic islet cells and immune cells. They may act as immunomodulators of circulating immune cells and can affect immune function through glutamate and GABA receptors. I found that T cells from human, rat and mouse lymph nodes expressed the mRNAs and proteins for specific GABA-A receptor subunits. GABA-evoked transient and tonic currents recorded using the patch clamp technique demonstrate the functional GABA-A channel in T cells. Furthermore, the mRNAs for specific iGlu, GABA-A and GABA-B receptor subunits and chloride cotransporters were detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from men, non-pregnant women, healthy and depressed pregnant women. The results indicate that the expression of iGlu, GABA-A and GABA-B receptors is related to gender, pregnancy and mental health and support the notion that glutamate and GABA receptors may modulate immune function. Intra- and interspecies variability exists in the expression and it is further influenced by physiological conditions.

    List of papers
    1. Selective increases of AMPA, NMDA, and kainate receptor subunit mRNAs in the hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex but not in prefrontal cortex of human alcoholics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selective increases of AMPA, NMDA, and kainate receptor subunit mRNAs in the hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex but not in prefrontal cortex of human alcoholics
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    2014 (English)In: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5102, E-ISSN 1662-5102, Vol. 8, p. 11-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Glutamate is the main excitatory transmitter in the human brain. Drugs that affect the glutamatergic signaling will alter neuronal excitability. Ethanol inhibits glutamate receptors. We examined the expression level of glutamate receptor subunit mRNAs in human post-mortem samples from alcoholics and compared the results to brain samples from control subjects. RNA from hippocampal dentate gyrus (HP-DG), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DL-PFC) samples from 21 controls and 19 individuals with chronic alcohol dependence were included in the study. Total RNA was assayed using quantitative RT-PCR. Out of the 16 glutamate receptor subunits, mRNAs encoding two AMPA [2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid] receptor subunits GluA2 and GluA3; three kainate receptor subunits GluK2, GluK3 and GluK5 and five NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2C, GluN2D, and GluN3A were significantly increased in the HP-DG region in alcoholics. In the OFC, mRNA encoding the NMDA receptor subunit GluN3A was increased, whereas in the DL-PFC, no differences in mRNA levels were observed. Our laboratory has previously shown that the expression of genes encoding inhibitory GABA-A receptors is altered in the HP-DG and OFC of alcoholics (Jin et al., 2011). Whether the changes in one neurotransmitter system drives changes in the other or if they change independently is currently not known. The results demonstrate that excessive long-term alcohol consumption is associated with altered expression of genes encoding glutamate receptors in a brain region-specific manner. It is an intriguing possibility that genetic predisposition to alcoholism may contribute to these gene expression changes.

    National Category
    Physiology Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-219489 (URN)10.3389/fncel.2014.00011 (DOI)000331053400001 ()24523671 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-03-03 Created: 2014-03-03 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Expression of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits is decreased in central amygdala of alcoholics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits is decreased in central amygdala of alcoholics
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    2014 (English)In: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5102, E-ISSN 1662-5102, Vol. 8, p. 288-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The central amygdala (CeA) has a role for mediating fear and anxiety responses. It is also involved in emotional imbalance caused by alcohol abuse and dependence and in regulating relapse to alcohol abuse. Growing evidences suggest that excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic (GABAergic) transmissions in the CeA are affected by chronic alcohol exposure. Human post-mortem CeA samples from male alcoholics (n = 9) and matched controls (n = 9) were assayed for the expression level of ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptors subunit mRNAs using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCB (RT-qPCR). Our data revealed that out of the 16 ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, mRNAs encoding two AMPA P-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-y1)propanoic acid] receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA4; one kainate receptor subunit GluK2; one NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor subunit GluN2D and one delta receptor subunit GluD2 were significantly decreased in the CeA of alcoholics. In contrast, of the 19 GABA-A receptor subunits, only the mRNA encoding the a2 subunit was significantly down-regulated in the CeA of the alcoholics as compared with control subjects. Our findings imply that the down-regulation of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits in the CeA of alcoholics may represent one of the molecular substrates underlying the new balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in alcohol dependence.

    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-239603 (URN)10.3389/fncel.2014.00288 (DOI)000344465400002 ()
    Available from: 2014-12-30 Created: 2014-12-29 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    3.
    The record could not be found. The reason may be that the record is no longer available or you may have typed in a wrong id in the address field.
    4. Different subtypes of GABA-A receptors are expressed in human, mouse and rat T lymphocytes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different subtypes of GABA-A receptors are expressed in human, mouse and rat T lymphocytes
    2012 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 8, p. e42959-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the most prominent neuroinhibitory transmitter in the brain, where it activates neuronalGABA-A receptors (GABA-A channels) located at synapses and outside of synapses. The GABA-A receptors are primarytargets of many clinically useful drugs. In recent years, GABA has been shown to act as an immunomodulatory molecule. Wehave examined in human, mouse and rat CD4+ and CD8+ T cells which subunit isoforms of the GABA-A channels areexpressed. The channel physiology and drug specificity is dictated by the GABA-A receptor subtype, which in turn isdetermined by the subunit isoforms that make the channel. There were 5, 8 and 13 different GABA-A subunit isoformsidentified in human, mouse and rat CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. Importantly, the γ2 subunit that imposesbenzodiazepine sensitivity on the GABA-A receptors, was only detected in the mouse T cells. Immunoblots andimmunocytochemistry showed abundant GABA-A channel proteins in the T cells from all three species. GABA-activatedwhole-cell transient and tonic currents were recorded. The currents were inhibited by picrotoxin, SR95531 and bicuculline,antagonists of GABA-A channels. Clearly, in both humans and rodents T cells, functional GABA-A channels are expressed butthe subtypes vary. It is important to bear in mind the interspecies difference when selecting the appropriate animal modelsto study the physiological role and pharmacological properties of GABA-A channels in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and whenselecting drugs aimed at modulating the human T cells function.

    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-172532 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0042959 (DOI)000307789700016 ()
    Available from: 2012-04-11 Created: 2012-04-11 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
    5. Expression of GABA receptors subunits in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is gender dependent, altered in pregnancy and modified by mental health
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression of GABA receptors subunits in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is gender dependent, altered in pregnancy and modified by mental health
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    2015 (English)In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 213, no 3, p. 575-585Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The concept of nerve-driven immunity recognizes a link between the nervous and the immune system. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain and receptors activated by GABA can be expressed by immune cells. Here we examined if the expression of GABA receptors and chloride transporters in human peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were influenced by gender, pregnancy or mental health.

    METHODS: We used RT-qPCR to determine the mRNA expression level in men (n=16), non-pregnant women (n=19), healthy pregnant women (n=27) and depressed pregnant women (n=15).

    RESULTS: The ρ2 subunit had the most prominent expression level of the GABA-A receptor subunits in all samples. The δ and ρ2 subunits were up-regulated by pregnancy whereas the ε subunit was more frequently expressed in healthy pregnant women than non-pregnant women who, in-turn, commonly expressed the α6 and the γ2 subunits. The β1 and ε subunits expression was altered by depression in pregnant women. The GABA-B1 receptor was up-regulated by depression in pregnant women while the transporters NKCC1 and KCC4 were down-regulated by pregnancy. The changes recorded in the mRNA expression levels imply participation of GABA receptors in establishing and maintaining tolerance in pregnancy. Importantly, the correlation of mental health with the expression of specific receptor subunits reveals a connection between the immune cells and the brain. Biomarkers for mental health may be identified in PBMCs.

    CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate the impact gender, pregnancy and mental health have on expression of GABA receptors plus chloride transporters expressed in human PBMCs.

    National Category
    Physiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-240372 (URN)10.1111/apha.12440 (DOI)000348531600007 ()25529063 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-01-07 Created: 2015-01-07 Last updated: 2018-01-11
    6. AMPA, NMDA and kainate glutamate receptor subunits are expressed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) where the expression of GluK4 is altered by pregnancy and GluN2D by depression in pregnant women
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>AMPA, NMDA and kainate glutamate receptor subunits are expressed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) where the expression of GluK4 is altered by pregnancy and GluN2D by depression in pregnant women
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    2017 (English)In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 305, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The amino acid glutamate opens cation permeable ion channels, the iGlu receptors. These ion channels are abundantly expressed in the mammalian brain where glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter. The neurotransmitters and their receptors are being increasingly detected in the cells of immune system. Here we examined the expression of the 18 known subunits of the iGlu receptors families; alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), kainate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and delta in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We compared the expression of the subunits between four groups: men, non-pregnant women, healthy pregnant women and depressed pregnant women.

    Out of 18 subunits of the iGlu receptors, mRNAs for 11 subunits were detected in PBMCs from men and nonpregnant women; AMPA: GluA3, GluA4, kainate: GluK2, GluK4, GluK5, NMDA: GluN1, GluN2C, GluN2D, GluN3A, GluN3B, and delta: GluD1. In the healthy and the depressed pregnant women, in addition, the delta GluD2 subunit was identified. The mRNAs for GluK4, GluK5, GluN2C and GluN2D were expressed at a higher level than other subunits. Gender, pregnancy or depression during pregnancy altered the expression of GluA3, GluK4, GluN2D, GluN3B and GluD1 iGlu subunit mRNAs. The greatest changes recorded were the lower GluA3 and GluK4 mRNA levels in pregnant women and the higher GluN2D mRNA level in healthy but not in depressed pregnant women as compared to non-pregnant individuals. Using subunit specific antibodies, the GluK4, GluK5, GluNl, GluN2C and GluN2D subunit proteins were identified in the PBMCs. The results show expression of specific iGlu receptor subunit in the PBMCs and support the idea of physiology-driven changes of iGlu receptors subtypes in the immune cells.

    Keywords
    Glutamate, iGluR subunits, Immune cells, Pregnancy, Depression, Physiology-driven changes
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282410 (URN)10.1016/j.jneuroim.2017.01.013 (DOI)000397694200009 ()28284346 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 521-2012-1789
    Available from: 2016-04-05 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
  • 23.
    Biglarnia, Ali-Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Nilsson, Kristina Ekdahl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Complement Interception Across Humoral Incompatibility in Solid Organ Transplantation: A Clinical Perspective2015In: IMMUNE RESPONSES TO BIOSURFACES: MECHANISMS AND THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS, 2015, p. 211-233Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The humoral barrier in transplant biology is the result of preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs), directed either against human leukocyte antigens (HLA) or non-HLA antigens such as blood group (ABO) molecules. The term "sensitization" applies to patients carrying these antibodies. Transplantation is widely accepted as a life-saving opportunity for patients with terminal end-organ disease. However, in sensitized patients, transplant outcome is hampered by antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) as a consequence of DSA exposure. Furthermore, sensitized patients have limited access to "matched" organs from the both living and deceased donor pool. Considering the crucial role of the complement system in the pathophysiology of AMR and the availability of complement intervention therapeutics, there is a growing interest in complement-targeting strategies. This review highlights the emerging importance of monitoring and modulation of the complement system in the context of enabling transplantation across humoral incompatibility in sensitized recipients with preformed anti-HLA or natural anti-ABO antibodies. It also discusses the significance of the complement system in the induction of accommodation and further emphasizes current and future perspectives of novel complement therapeutics.

  • 24. Bonnedahl, Jonas
    et al.
    Hernandez, Jorge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine.
    Stedt, Johan
    Waldenstrom, Jonas
    Olsen, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Drobni, Mirva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine.
    Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamases in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Gulls, Alaska, USA2014In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 897-899Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Bremer, Hanna D.
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Clin Sci, Box 7054, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Lattwein, Erik
    Euroimmun AG, Lubeck, Germany..
    Renneker, Stefanie
    Euroimmun AG, Lubeck, Germany..
    Lilliehook, Inger
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Univ Anim Hosp, Clin Pathol Lab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hansson-Hamlin, Helene
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Clin Sci, Box 7054, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Identification of specific antinuclear antibodies in dogs using a line immunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay2015In: Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology, ISSN 0165-2427, E-ISSN 1873-2534, Vol. 168, no 3-4, p. 233-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circulating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are commonly present in the systemic autoimmune disease Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and in other systemic rheumatic diseases, in humans as well as in dogs. The indirect immunofluorescence (IIF)-ANA test is the standard method for detecting ANA. Further testing for specific ANA with immunoblot techniques or ELISAs is routinely performed in humans to aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease. Several specific ANA identified in humans have been identified also in suspected canine SLE but, in contrast to humans, investigation of autoantibodies in canine SLE is mainly restricted to the IIF-ANA test. Our aim was to identify both known and novel specific ANA in dogs and to investigate if different IIF-ANA patterns are associated with different specific ANA in dogs. Sera from 240 dogs with suspicion of autoimmune disease (210 IIF-ANA positive (ANA(pos)) and 30 IIF-ANA negative (ANA(neg))) as well as sera from 27 healthy controls were included. The samples were analysed with a line immunoassay, LIA (Euroline ANA Profile 5, Euroimmun, Lubeck, Germany) and four different ELISAs (Euroimmun). The ANA(pos) dogs were divided in two groups depending on the type of IIF-ANA pattern. Of the 210 ANA(pos) samples 68 were classified as ANA homogenous (ANA(H)) and 141 as ANA speckled (ANA(S)), one sample was not possible to classify. Dogs in the ANA(H) group had, compared to the other groups, most frequently high levels of anti-double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) and anti-nucleosome ANA. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were confirmed in some dogs with the Crithidia luciliae indirect immunofluorescence test (CLIFT).The frequency of ANA(H) dogs with values above those observed in the healthy group was significantly higher compared to ANA(S) dogs for anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome, and anti-histone reactivity. Dogs in the ANA(S) group had, compared to the other groups, most frequently high levels of anti-ribonucleoproteins (RNP) and/or anti-Smith (Sm) antibodies. Reactivity against Sjogren's syndrome related antigens (SS)-A (including the Ro-60 and Ro-52 subcomponents), SS-B, histidyl tRNA synthetase (Jo-1), topoisomerase I antigen (Scl-70), polymyositis-scleroderma antigen (PM-Scl) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was also noted in individual dogs. In conclusion, by using a commercial LIA and different ELISAs originally developed for detection of human ANA, we identified several specific ANA in serum samples from dogs sampled for IIF-ANA testing. Further, we found that the types of IIF-ANA pattern were associated with reactivity against some particular nuclear antigens.

  • 26.
    Brink, Mikael
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Div Rheumatol, SE-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Hansson, Monika
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mathsson-Alm, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wijayatunga, Priyantha
    Umea Univ, Dept Stat, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Verheul, Marije K.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Rheumatol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Trouw, Leendert A.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Rheumatol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Holmdahl, Rikard
    Karolinska Inst, Med Inflammat Res Med Biophys & Biochem, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Div Rheumatol, SE-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Rheumatoid factor isotypes in relation to antibodies against citrullinated peptides and carbamylated proteins before the onset of rheumatoid arthritis2016In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 18, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The presence of rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP) and antibodies against citrullinated protein and peptides (ACPA) precedes the onset of symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by several years. Relationships between the development of these antibodies are not obvious. Methods: Three isotypes [immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgG and IgM) of RF were analysed in 321 pre-symptomatic individuals who provided 598 samples collected a median of 6.2 (interquartile range 7.2) years before the onset of symptoms, and in 492 population control subjects. All samples were donated to the Biobank of Northern Sweden. RF isotypes were analysed using the EliA system (Phadia GmbH, Freiburg, Germany) with 96 % specificity according to receiver operating characteristic curves. Ten ACPA specificities were analysed using the ImmunoCAP ISAC system, and anti-CCP2 and anti-CarP antibodies were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: The frequencies of RF isotypes in pre-symptomatic individuals were significantly increased compared with control subjects (p < 0.0001). In samples collected >= 15 years before the onset of symptoms, the IgA-RF isotype was significantly more prevalent than the most frequent ACPAs. Combinations of IgM- and IgA-RF isotypes with ACPA specificities [a-enolase (CEP-1/Eno(5-21))], fibrinogen (Fib)beta(36-52), Fiba(580-600), filaggrin (CCP-1/Fil(307-324)) and anti-CCP2 antibodies were associated with a significantly shorter time to onset of symptoms (p < 0.001-0.05). Using conditional inference tree analysis, anti-CCP2 in combination with anti-filaggrin antibodies gave the highest probability, 97.5 %, for disease development. Conclusions: RF isotypes predicted the development of RA, particularly in combination with ACPA, anti-CCP2 or anti-CarP antibodies. The highest probability for disease development was the presence of anti-CCP2 and anti-filaggrin antibodies.

  • 27.
    Cerenius, Lage
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Babu, Ramesh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Söderhäll, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    In vitro effects on bacterial growth of phenoloxidase reaction products2010In: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology, ISSN 0022-2011, E-ISSN 1096-0805, Vol. 103, no 1, p. 21-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An active phenoloxidase preparation from the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus exhibited a strong antibacterial effect in vitro on the bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae whereas a weaker but still significant effect against Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. In most cases reduction of bacterial growth was stronger when dopamine was used as substrate as compared to L-dopa. The effect on bacteria was abolished if no substrate was available for the phenoloxidase or in the presence of the phenoloxidase inhibitor phenylthiourea.

  • 28.
    Cerenius, Lage
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology. Jämförande fysiologi.
    Bangyeekhun, Eakaphun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology. Jämförande fysiologi.
    Keyser, Pia
    Söderhäll, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology. jämförande fysiologi.
    Söderhäll, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology. jämförande fysiologi.
    Host prophenoloxidase expression in freshwater crayfish is linked to increased resistance to the crayfish plague fungus, Aphanomyces astaci.2003In: Cell Microbiol, ISSN 1462-5814, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 353-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Cerenius, Lage
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Kawabata, Shun-ichiro
    Lee, Bok Luel
    Nonaka, Masaru
    Söderhäll, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Proteolytic cascades and their involvement in invertebrate immunity2010In: TIBS -Trends in Biochemical Sciences. Regular ed., ISSN 0968-0004, E-ISSN 1362-4326, Vol. 35, no 10, p. 575-583Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacteria and other potential pathogens are cleared rapidly from the body fluids of invertebrates by the immediate response of the innate immune system. Proteolytic cascades, following their initiation by pattern recognition proteins, control several such reactions, notably coagulation, melanisation, activation of the Toll receptor and complement-like reactions. However, there is considerable variation among invertebrates and these cascades, although widespread, are not present in all phyla. In recent years, significant progress has been made in identifying and characterizing these cascades in insects. Notably, recent work has identified several connections and shared principles among the different pathways, suggesting that cross-talk between them may be common.

  • 30.
    Cerenius, Lage
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Kawabata, Shun-ichiro
    Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Söderhäll, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Biological and Immunological Aspects of Innate Defence Mechanisms Activated by (1,3)- β -Glucans and Related Polysaccharides in Invertebrates2009In: Chemistry, Biochemistry and Biology of (1-›3)-β-Glucans and Related Polysaccharides. / [ed] Antony Bacic, Geoffrey B. Fincher & Bruce A. Stone, Burlington, MA: Academic Press , 2009, p. 563-577Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    (1,3)- β -glucans are powerful stimulants of a wide variety of innate defence reactions in invertebrates. These polysaccharides exert a great influence on reactions such as induction of antimicrobial peptides, cellular defence such as encapsulation and phagocytosis, and on the melanization and coagulation cascades. In most cases, these reactions set up an effective defence against microorganisms containing (1,3)- β -glucans or (1,3;1,6)- β -glucans in their outer structures (i.e. mainly fungi and oomycetes).

     

  • 31.
    Cerenius, Lage
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Söderhäll, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Coagulation in invertebrates2011In: Journal of Innate Immunity, ISSN 1662-811X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 3-8Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In most animals there is a need to quickly prevent the loss of blood or equivalent fluids through inflicted injuries. In invertebrates with an open circulatory system (and sometimes a hydroskeleton as well) these losses may otherwise soon be fatal. Also, there is a need to prevent microbes that have gained access to the body through the wound from disseminating throughout the open circulatory system. Therefore, many invertebrates possess a coagulation system to prevent such accidents from having too serious consequences. In this review we discuss recent developments in a few animals - mainly arthropods - where more detailed data are available. It is likely, however, that corresponding systems are present in most phyla, but this is still unchartered territory.

  • 32. Cui, Yue
    et al.
    Dahlin, Joakim S.
    Feinstein, Ricardo
    Bankova, Lora G.
    Xing, Wei
    Shin, Kichul
    Gurish, Michael F.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    Mouse Mast Cell Protease-6 and MHC Are Involved in the Development of Experimental Asthma2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 193, no 10, p. 4783-4789Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Dahlin, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Mast Cell Progenitor Trafficking in Allergic Airway Inflammation2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mast cell progenitors originate from the bone marrow and migrate to the lungs via the blood. During maturation, these cells acquire granules that contain a potent array of bronchoconstrictive mediators. The number of pulmonary mast cells is augmented in asthmatic patients and in mice with allergic airway inflammation, possibly contributing to airway hyperreactivity. An increase in mast cells is likely due to an increased recruitment of committed mast cell progenitors from the blood. However, until now a committed mast cell progenitor population has not been found in adult peripheral blood. We isolated Lin- c-kithi ST2+ integrin β7hi CD16/32hi progenitors from murine blood and showed that these cells were committed to the mast cell lineage. Based on the expression of FcεRI, these cells were less mature in Th1-prone C57BL/6 mice than in Th2-prone BALB/c mice.

    Asthma is associated with elevated levels of IgE. Upon exposure to allergens, IgE immune complexes are formed. In a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we showed that intranasal administration of IgE immune complexes to antigen-sensitized mice resulted in an increased number of mast cell progenitors compared with antigen administration alone. The increase in mast cell progenitors was independent of the low-affinity IgE receptor CD23. Rather, signaling through the common FcRγ-chain was required to enhance the number of lung mast cell progenitors. Signaling through FcεRI was likely responsible for the increase. However a role for FcγRIV could not be excluded.

    CD11c+ cells, such as dendritic cells, are important for antigen sensitization. In a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, these cells are also important for the development of airway hyperreactivity, eosinophilia and Th2 cytokine production in response to antigen challenge. We showed that CD11c+ cells are critical for the recruitment of lung mast cell progenitors and the subsequent increase in mast cells. These CD11c+ cells were needed for the upregulation of endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), which is a prerequisite for the antigen-induced recruitment of lung mast cell progenitors.

    List of papers
    1. IgE Immune Complexes Stimulate an Increase in Lung Mast Cell Progenitors in a Mouse Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>IgE Immune Complexes Stimulate an Increase in Lung Mast Cell Progenitors in a Mouse Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation
    2011 (English)In: PLoS One, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 5, p. e20261-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Mast cell numbers and allergen specific IgE are increased in the lungs of patients with allergic asthma and this can be reproduced in mouse models. The increased number of mast cells is likely due to recruitment of mast cell progenitors that mature in situ. We hypothesized that formation of IgE immune complexes in the lungs of sensitized mice increase the migration of mast cell progenitors to this organ. To study this, a model of allergic airway inflammation where mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) in alum twice followed by three daily intranasal challenges of either OVA coupled to trinitrophenyl (TNP) alone or as immune complexes with IgE-anti-TNP, was used. Mast cell progenitors were quantified by a limiting dilution assay. IgE immune complex challenge of sensitized mice elicited three times more mast cell progenitors per lung than challenge with the same dose of antigen alone. This dose of antigen challenge alone did not increase the levels of mast cell progenitors compared to unchallenged mice. IgE immune complex challenge of sensitized mice also enhanced the frequency of mast cell progenitors per 10 6 mononuclear cells by 2.1-fold. The enhancement of lung mast cell progenitors by IgE immune complex challenge was lost in FcR gamma deficient mice but not in CD23 deficient mice. Our data show that IgE immune complex challenge enhances the number of mast cell progenitors in the lung through activation of an Fc receptor associated with the FcR gamma chain. This most likely takes place via activation of Fc epsilon RI, although activation via Fc gamma RIV or a combination of the two receptors cannot be excluded. IgE immune complex-mediated enhancement of lung MCp numbers is a new reason to target IgE in therapies against allergic asthma.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-154525 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0020261 (DOI)000290771200055 ()21625525 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2011-06-07 Created: 2011-06-07 Last updated: 2014-01-23Bibliographically approved
    2. CD11c(+) Cells Are Required for Antigen-Induced Increase of Mast Cells in the Lung
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>CD11c(+) Cells Are Required for Antigen-Induced Increase of Mast Cells in the Lung
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 189, no 8, p. 3869-3877Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with allergic asthma have more lung mast cells, which likely worsens the symptoms. In experimental asthma, CD11c(+) cells have to be present during the challenge phase for several features of allergic inflammation to occur. Whether CD11c(+) cells play a role for Ag-induced increases of lung mast cells is unknown. In this study, we used diphtheria toxin treatment of sensitized CD11c-diphtheria toxin receptor transgenic mice to deplete CD11c(+) cells. We demonstrate that recruitment of mast cell progenitors to the lung is substantially reduced when CD11c(+) cells are depleted during the challenge phase. This correlated with an impaired induction of endothelial VCAM-1 and led to a significantly reduced number of mature mast cells 1 wk after challenge. Collectively, these data suggest that Ag challenge stimulates CD11c(+) cells to produce cytokines and/or chemokines required for VCAM-1 upregulation on the lung endothelium, which in turn is crucial for the Ag-induced mast cell progenitor recruitment and the increase in mast cell numbers.

    National Category
    Immunology Immunology in the medical area
    Research subject
    Immunology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-184515 (URN)10.4049/jimmunol.1201200 (DOI)000309590900014 ()22972929 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council
    Available from: 2012-11-07 Created: 2012-11-07 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
    3. Committed mast cell progenitors in mouse blood differ in maturity between Th1 and Th2 strains
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Committed mast cell progenitors in mouse blood differ in maturity between Th1 and Th2 strains
    2013 (English)In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 68, no 10, p. 1333-1337Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Mast cell progenitors (MCp) leave the bone marrow and migrate to peripheral tissues where they mature. Although the existence of committed MCp in adult mouse and human blood has been postulated, they have never been found. We have isolated a rare population of cells in adult mouse blood, committed to the mast cell lineage. These were identified as lineage c-kithi ST2+ integrin β7hi CD16/32hi cells. Moreover, a major difference in maturity of these cells based on FcεRI expression was observed between the Th2-prone BALB/c strain and the Th1-prone C57BL/6 strain (66% vs 25% FcεRI+, respectively). Therefore, the choice of mouse strain is critical when studying disease models such as experimental asthma where mast cells and their progenitors are involved.

    National Category
    Immunology Immunology in the medical area
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-205507 (URN)10.1111/all.12223 (DOI)000326024300015 ()
    Available from: 2013-09-02 Created: 2013-08-19 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
  • 34.
    Dahlin, Joakim S
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Feinstein, Ricardo
    Statens veterinärmedicinska anstalt.
    Cui, Yue
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Heyman, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    CD11c(+) Cells Are Required for Antigen-Induced Increase of Mast Cells in the Lung2012In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 189, no 8, p. 3869-3877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with allergic asthma have more lung mast cells, which likely worsens the symptoms. In experimental asthma, CD11c(+) cells have to be present during the challenge phase for several features of allergic inflammation to occur. Whether CD11c(+) cells play a role for Ag-induced increases of lung mast cells is unknown. In this study, we used diphtheria toxin treatment of sensitized CD11c-diphtheria toxin receptor transgenic mice to deplete CD11c(+) cells. We demonstrate that recruitment of mast cell progenitors to the lung is substantially reduced when CD11c(+) cells are depleted during the challenge phase. This correlated with an impaired induction of endothelial VCAM-1 and led to a significantly reduced number of mature mast cells 1 wk after challenge. Collectively, these data suggest that Ag challenge stimulates CD11c(+) cells to produce cytokines and/or chemokines required for VCAM-1 upregulation on the lung endothelium, which in turn is crucial for the Ag-induced mast cell progenitor recruitment and the increase in mast cell numbers.

  • 35.
    Dahlin, Joakim S
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Heyman, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Committed mast cell progenitors in mouse blood differ in maturity between Th1 and Th2 strains2013In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 68, no 10, p. 1333-1337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mast cell progenitors (MCp) leave the bone marrow and migrate to peripheral tissues where they mature. Although the existence of committed MCp in adult mouse and human blood has been postulated, they have never been found. We have isolated a rare population of cells in adult mouse blood, committed to the mast cell lineage. These were identified as lineage c-kithi ST2+ integrin β7hi CD16/32hi cells. Moreover, a major difference in maturity of these cells based on FcεRI expression was observed between the Th2-prone BALB/c strain and the Th1-prone C57BL/6 strain (66% vs 25% FcεRI+, respectively). Therefore, the choice of mouse strain is critical when studying disease models such as experimental asthma where mast cells and their progenitors are involved.

  • 36. Didinger, Chelsea
    et al.
    Eimes, John
    Lillie, Mette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Waldman, Bruce
    Multiple major histocompatibility complex class I genes in Asian anurans: Ontogeny and phylogeny2017In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 70, p. 69-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amphibians, as the first terrestrial vertebrates, offer a window into early major histocompatibility complex (MHC) evolution. We characterized the MHC class I of two Korean amphibians, the Asiatic toad (Bufo gargarizans) and the Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). We found at least four transcribed MHC class I (MHC I) loci, the highest number confirmed in any anuran to date. Furthermore, we identified MHC I transcripts in terrestrial adults, and possibly in aquatic larvae, of both species. We conducted a phylogenetic analysis based on MHC I sequence data and found that B. gargarizans and H. japonica cluster together in the superfamily Nobleobatrachia. We further identified three supertypes shared by the two species. Our results reveal substantial variation in the number of MHC I loci in anurans and suggest that certain supertypes have particular physiochemical properties that may confer pathogen resistance.

  • 37. Dubicke, Aurelija
    et al.
    Andersson, Peter
    Centini, Gabriele
    Fransson, Emma
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Anderson, Eva
    Bystrom, Birgitta
    Petraglia, Felice
    Sverremark, Eva
    Ekman-Ordeberg, Gunvor
    Altered Balance in Pro-Inflammatory and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines in Preterm Cervical Ripening2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38. Dubicke, Aurelija
    et al.
    Fransson, Emma
    Karolinska Instituet.
    Bystrom, Birgitta
    Yellon, Steven M.
    Ekman-Ordeberg, Gunvor
    Collagen Expression in Human Preterm Cervix.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39. Dubicke, Aurelija
    et al.
    Hell, Eva
    Fransson, Emma
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ekman-Ordeberg, Gunvor
    Danielsson, Kristina Gemzell
    Marchini, Giovanna
    Circulating Cathelicidin Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 Levels in Mothers and Preterm and Term Newborn Infants.2018In: Reproductive Investigation, Vol. 25, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Dubicke, Aurelija
    et al.
    Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institute. Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sverremark-Ekström, Eva
    Stockholms universitet.
    Fransson, Emma
    Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Centini, Gabriela
    Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Reproductive Medicine, University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Ital.
    Andersson, Eva
    Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institute. Stockholm, Sweden.
    Byström, Birgitta
    Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institute. Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekman-Ordeberga, Gunvor
    Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmström, Anders Malmström
    Department of Experimental Medical Science, University of Lund, 221 84 Lund, Sweden.
    Petraglia, Felice
    Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Reproductive Medicine, University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy.
    Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human preterm and term cervical ripening2010In: Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 0165-0378, E-ISSN 1872-7603, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 176-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cervical ripening is necessary for successful delivery. Since cytokines are believed to be involved in this process, the aim of this study was to investigate possible changes in the mRNA and protein expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-12, IL-18) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IL-13)in the human cervix during pregnancy, term and preterm labor. Cervical biopsies were taken from 59 women: 21 at preterm labor, 24 at term labor, 10 at term not in labor and 4 from non-pregnant women. mRNA was analyzed with real-time RT-PCR and protein expression and/or secretion with immunohistochemistry and ELISA. There was an upregulation of mRNA for IL-10, IL-13, IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta in the laboring groups, while mRNA for IL-12 and IL-18 was downregulated. IL-4 mRNA was detected more frequently, while IL-12 mRNA expression was lower, in the preterm labor group than in the term labor group. The protein levels of IL-4 and IL-12 were lower and IL-18 tended to be higher in the labor groups, while IL-10 protein levels were unaffected by labor. IL-4 protein levels were significantly higher in the preterm subgroup with bacterial infection than in the non-infected group. IL-10 had higher expression in squamous epithelium at preterm labor than at term. In conclusion, the major changes in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine mRNA and protein expression in cervix occur during the labor process irrespective of the length of gestation. Our results indicate that dysregulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines in the human cervix could be involved in the pathogenesis of preterm labor.

  • 41.
    Dölfors, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
    Växters effektorutlösta försvars funktionoch evolution: Ett uthålligt skydd mot patogener?2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The diversity among genes conferring resistance (R) against infectious diseases is very high in the plant kingdom, especially in the effector triggered class of defense. This article describes the interactions between the plant effector triggered immunity and pathogen effectors and examines the evolutionary and genetic mechanisms for the emergence of new resistance. R gene products have a typical domain structure and interacts both directly and indirectly with pathogen effectors. Upon contact with an effector a defense response is triggered that may prevent the further pathogen growth. Multiple genetic mechanisms act simultaneously on the R-genes, which results in a rapid diversification of novel R variants. The intimate co-evolution of many existing plant-pathogen systems form the evolutionary pattern of R genes. Diversifying positive selection via the biological arms race model and conservative negative frequency-dependent selection are both important coevolutionary processes. This article indicates that the plant immune system is adaptive and robust, but also highlights the lack of knowledge in plant resistance research.

  • 42. Ek, Weronica
    et al.
    Sahlqvist, Anna-Stina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity.
    Crooks, Lucy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Sgonc, Roswitha
    Dietrich, Hermann
    Wick, Georg
    Ekwall, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Carlborg, Örjan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kämpe, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity.
    Kerje, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Mapping QTL affecting a systemic sclerosis-like disorder in a cross between UCD-200 and red jungle fowl chickens2012In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 352-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) or scleroderma is a rare, autoimmune, multi-factorial disease characterized by early microvascular alterations, inflammation, and fibrosis. Chickens from the UCD-200 line develop a hereditary SSc-like disease, showing all the hallmarks of the human disorder, which makes this line a promising model to study genetic factors underlying the disease. A backcross was generated between UCD-200 chickens and its wild ancestor - the red jungle fowl and a genome-scan was performed to identify loci affecting early (21days of age) and late (175days of age) ischemic lesions of the comb. A significant difference in frequency of disease was observed between sexes in the BC population, where the homogametic males were more affected than females, and there was evidence for a protective W chromosome effect. Three suggestive disease predisposing loci were mapped to chromosomes 2, 12 and 14. Three orthologues of genes implicated in human SSc are located in the QTL region on chromosome 2, TGFRB1, EXOC2-IRF4 and COL1A2, as well as CCR8, which is more generally related to immune function. IGFBP3 is also located within the QTL on chromosome 2 and earlier studies have showed increased IGFBP3 serum levels in SSc patients. To our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal a potential genetic association between IGFBP3 and SSc. Another gene with an immunological function, SOCS1, is located in the QTL region on chromosome 14. These results illustrate the usefulness of the UCD-200 chicken as a model of human SSc and motivate further in-depth functional studies of the implicated candidate genes.

  • 43.
    Eliasson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Development of immunological methods and Real-Time PCR for detection of Macadamia nut (Macadamia spp.)2005Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A new European labeling directive (2003/89/EC) states that certain foods and products derived thereof must always be declared. Among the tree nuts specified is Macadamia nut (Macadamia spp.). During the last few years, cases of IgE-allergic reactions, even severe anaphylaxes, have been reported. Reliable methods for the detection of this nut are needed.

    Protein from Macadamia nuts was isolated. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in SDS revealed two main protein bands of about 20 and 50kDa. These protein bands were cut and extracted from the gel and rabbits were immunized with each protein.

    Immunoblotting showed dominant reactivity with the respective antigens. The antisera were further tested for specificity in immunodiffusion and in rocket immunoelectrophoresis.

    In addition, a specific DNA-method was developed, based on Real-Time PCR using Macadamia vicilin as target sequence. Two different primer pairs were tested. Specificity was tested against potentially related nuts. Optimisation of primer and probe concentrations was performed. The limit of detection was 2-4 pg DNA, corresponding to a macadamia nut concentration of 50 to 100 μg per g. In a background of soybean DNA, down to 0,01 % macadamia DNA could be detected.

  • 44.
    Fauvarque, Marie-Odile
    et al.
    CEA, Institut de Recherches en Technologies et Sciences pour le Vivant, Laboratoire de Biologie à Grande Echelle, F-38054 Grenoble, France.
    Williams, Michael J
    Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 2TZ, UK .
    Drosophila cellular immunity: a story of migration and adhesion2011In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 124, no 9, p. 1373-1382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research during the past 15 years has led to significant breakthroughs, providing evidence of a high degree of similarity between insect and mammalian innate immune responses, both humoural and cellular, and highlighting Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for studying the evolution of innate immunity. In a manner similar to cells of the mammalian monocyte and macrophage lineage, Drosophila immunosurveillance cells (haemocytes) have a number of roles. For example, they respond to wound signals, are involved in wound healing and contribute to the coagulation response. Moreover, they participate in the phagocytosis and encapsulation of invading pathogens, are involved in the removal of apoptotic bodies and produce components of the extracellular matrix. There are several reasons for using the Drosophila cellular immune response as a model to understand cell signalling during adhesion and migration in vivo: many genes involved in the regulation of Drosophila haematopoiesis and cellular immunity have been maintained across taxonomic groups ranging from flies to humans, many aspects of Drosophila and mammalian innate immunity seem to be conserved, and Drosophila is a simplified and well-studied genetic model system. In the present Commentary, we will discuss what is known about cellular adhesion and migration in the Drosophila cellular immune response, during both embryonic and larval development, and where possible compare it with related mechanisms in vertebrates.

  • 45. Feyerabend, Thorsten B
    et al.
    Hausser, Heinz
    Tietz, Annette
    Blum, Carmen
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Immunology. Molekylär immunologi.
    Straus, Anita H
    Takahashi, Hélio K
    Morgan, Ellen S
    Dvorak, Ann M
    Fehling, Hans Jörg
    Rodewald, Hans-Reimer
    Loss of histochemical identity in mast cells lacking carboxypeptidase A.2005In: Mol Cell Biol, ISSN 0270-7306, Vol. 25, no 14, p. 6199-210Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Fransson, Emma
    et al.
    Department for Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dubicke, Aurelija
    Bystrom, Birgitta
    Ekman-Ordeberg, Gunvor
    Hjelmstedt, Anna
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholms universitet, Stressforskningsinstitutet.
    Negative emotions and cytokines in maternal and cord serum at preterm birth2012In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology and Microbiology, ISSN 8755-8920, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 506-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem This study investigates whether affectivity differs between mothers delivering preterm and term and whether maternal and umbilical cord serum cytokines differ between these groups. Further, whether there are associations between mothers emotions and maternal and cord cytokines at preterm and term birth. Method of study Twenty-seven mothers delivering preterm and 37 mothers delivering at term reported positive/negative affect and previous depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Blood samples from mothers in labor and cord samples (23 preterm and 33 term) were analyzed for cytokines. Results Maternal IL-8 was lower at preterm delivery compared with term. In the preterm group only, associations were found between negative emotions and maternal IL-6, IL-8 and cord IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, and IL-18. Conclusion The findings indicate associations in preterm delivery between negative emotions and both maternal and neonate immune activity. Future studies should investigate whether such associations are part of the etiology of preterm delivery.

  • 47.
    Fransson, Moa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Piras, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Wang, Hao
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Burman, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Duprez, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Harris, Robert A
    Leblanc, Katarina
    Magnusson, Peetra U
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Brittebo, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Loskog, Angelica S I
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Intranasal Delivery of CNS-Retargeted Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Prolongs Treatment Efficacy of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis2014In: Immunology, ISSN 0019-2805, E-ISSN 1365-2567, Vol. 142, no 3, p. 431-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) is currently of interest for a number of diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS). MSCs is well known to target inflamed tissues however, in a therapeutic scenery, systemic administration will lead to few cells reaching the brain. We hypothesized that MSCs may target the brain upon intranasal (i.n) administration and persist in CNS tissue if expressing a CNS-targeting receptor. To demonstrate proof of concept, MSCs were genetically engineered to express a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-specific receptor. Engineered MSCs retained their immunosuppressive capacity, infiltrated into the brain upon i.n. cell administration, and were able to significantly reduce disease symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The mice treated with CNS-targeting MSCs were resistant to further EAE induction whereas non-targeted MSC did not give such persistent effects. Histological analysis revealed increased brain restoration in engineered MSC-treated mice. In conclusion, MSCs can be genetically engineered to target the brain and prolong therapeutic efficacy in an EAE model.

  • 48.
    Frisk, Jun Mei Hu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Kjellén, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Melo, Fabio R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Öhrvik, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Pejler, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anat Physiol & Biochem, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Regulates Proteoglycan Composition of Mast Cell Secretory Granules2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, article id 1670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mast cells (MCs) are characterized by an abundance of lysosome-like secretory granules filled with immunomodulatory compounds including histamine, cytokines, lysosomal hydrolases, MC-restricted proteases, and serglycin proteoglycans. The latter are essential for promoting the storage of other granule compounds and are built up of the serglycin core protein to which highly sulfated and thereby negatively charged glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of heparin or chondroitin sulfate type are attached. In the search for mechanisms operating in regulating MC granule homeostasis, we here investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. We show that inhibition of MEK1/2 (a MAPK kinase) leads to increased metachromatic staining of MC granules, indicative of increased proteoglycan content. Indeed, MEK1/2 inhibition caused a profound increase in the expression of the gene coding for the serglycin core protein and of genes coding for various enzymes involved in the biosynthesis/sulfation of the GAGs attached to the serglycin core protein. This was accompanied by corresponding increases in the levels of the respective GAGs. Deletion of the serglycin core protein abrogated the induction of enzymes operative in proteoglycan synthesis, indicating that availability of the serglycin proteoglycan core protein has a regulatory function impacting on the expression of the various serglycin-modifying enzymes. MEK1/2 inhibition also caused a substantial increase in the expression of granule-localized, proteoglycan-binding proteases. Altogether, this study identifies a novel role for MAPK signaling in regulating the content of secretory granules in MCs.

  • 49.
    Fromell, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Johansson, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Biomat Chem, Kalmar, Sweden..
    Dührkop, Claudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Adler, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Usterud, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hamad, Osama A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Biomat Chem, Kalmar, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Generation of an alternative pathway convertase by contact-activated C3 is dependent on the conformation of C32018In: Molecular Immunology, ISSN 0161-5890, E-ISSN 1872-9142, Vol. 102, p. 193-193Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Fu, Zhirong
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Thorpe, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Alemayehu, Rahel
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Roy, Ananya
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kervinen, Jukka
    Fraunhofer USA Ctr Mol Biotechnol, Newark, DE 19711 USA..
    de Garavilla, Lawrence
    GDL Pharmaceut Consulting & Contracting, Downingtown, PA 19335 USA..
    Abrink, Magnus
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Highly Selective Cleavage of Cytokines and Chemokines by the Human Mast Cell Chymase and Neutrophil Cathepsin G2017In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 198, no 4, p. 1474-1483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human mast cell chymase (HC) and human neutrophil cathepsin G (hCG) show relatively similar cleavage specificities: they both have chymotryptic activity but can also cleave efficiently after leucine. Their relatively broad specificity suggests that they may cleave almost any substrate if present in high enough concentrations or for a sufficiently long time. A number of potential substrates have been identified for these enzymes and, recently, these enzymes have also been implicated in regulating cytokine activity by cleaving numerous cytokines and chemokines. To obtain a better understanding of their selectivity for various potential in vivo substrates, we analyzed the cleavage of a panel of 51 active recombinant cytokines and chemokines. Surprisingly, our results showed a high selectivity of HC; only 4 of 51 of these proteins were substantially cleaved. hCG cleaved a few additional proteins, although this occurred after adding almost equimolar amounts of enzyme to target. The explanation for this wide difference in activity against peptides or other linear substrates compared with native proteins is most likely related to the reduced accessibility of the enzymes to potential cleavage sites in folded proteins. In this article, we present evidence that sites not exposed on the surface of the protein are not cleaved by the enzyme. Interestingly, both enzymes readily cleaved IL-18 and IL-33, two IL-1-related alarmins, as well as the cytokine IL-15, which is important for T cell and NK cell homeostasis. Cleavage of the alarmins by HC and hCG suggests a function in regulating excessive inflammation.

1234 1 - 50 of 188
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